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Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report

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Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report. / Smallwood, Jane; Jolley, Suzanne; Makhijani, Jyotsna; Grice, Sarah; O'Donoghue, Emma; Bendon, Paula; Greenaway, Liz P.; Onwumere, Juliana.

In: Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches, 12.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Smallwood, J, Jolley, S, Makhijani, J, Grice, S, O'Donoghue, E, Bendon, P, Greenaway, LP & Onwumere, J 2016, 'Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report', Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647

APA

Smallwood, J., Jolley, S., Makhijani, J., Grice, S., O'Donoghue, E., Bendon, P., Greenaway, L. P., & Onwumere, J. (2016). Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report. Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647

Vancouver

Smallwood J, Jolley S, Makhijani J, Grice S, O'Donoghue E, Bendon P et al. Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report. Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches. 2016 Dec 12. https://doi.org/10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647

Author

Smallwood, Jane ; Jolley, Suzanne ; Makhijani, Jyotsna ; Grice, Sarah ; O'Donoghue, Emma ; Bendon, Paula ; Greenaway, Liz P. ; Onwumere, Juliana. / Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report. In: Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches. 2016.

Bibtex Download

@article{7998c0c05edb44478870b5b4e60c2932,
title = "Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report",
abstract = "Background: Research demonstrates the importance of supportingcaregivers of people with psychosis, but routine implementation studies arelacking. We evaluate a newly-developed caregiver support service, offeringindividual and group psychoeducation, practical advice and emotionalsupport, working alongside usual community mental health provision forpeople with established psychosis.Aims: We aimed to provide analysis of preliminary data on the rate andsuitability of referrals, engagement, and helpfulness, to inform futurelarger-scale implementation and evaluation.Method: We conducted a mixed-methods audit during the service{\textquoteright}s first tenoperational months (01/09/2013 to 30/06/2014). Caregivers gavequalitative feedback and completed measures of the impact of caregivingpre- and post-intervention.Results: Referrals totalled 103 (10/month), with 45 (44%) initial meetings;and 28 (27%) individual interventions (≥1 sessions, mode=3). Caregiverswere predominantly black British/African/Caribbean parents. Self-reportedneeds and caregiving experiences were consistent with the literature. Two thirdsof caregivers were clinically distressed. Qualitative feedback showedthat caregivers valued the service. Outcomes suggest improvedexperiences of caregiving following intervention.Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential benefits and challenges ofroutinely providing psychologically-focused caregiver support. Limitationsand future plans are discussed.",
author = "Jane Smallwood and Suzanne Jolley and Jyotsna Makhijani and Sarah Grice and Emma O'Donoghue and Paula Bendon and Greenaway, {Liz P.} and Juliana Onwumere",
year = "2016",
month = dec,
day = "12",
doi = "10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647",
language = "English",
journal = "Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches",
issn = "1752-2439",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Implementing specialist psychological support for caregivers in psychosis services: A preliminary report

AU - Smallwood, Jane

AU - Jolley, Suzanne

AU - Makhijani, Jyotsna

AU - Grice, Sarah

AU - O'Donoghue, Emma

AU - Bendon, Paula

AU - Greenaway, Liz P.

AU - Onwumere, Juliana

PY - 2016/12/12

Y1 - 2016/12/12

N2 - Background: Research demonstrates the importance of supportingcaregivers of people with psychosis, but routine implementation studies arelacking. We evaluate a newly-developed caregiver support service, offeringindividual and group psychoeducation, practical advice and emotionalsupport, working alongside usual community mental health provision forpeople with established psychosis.Aims: We aimed to provide analysis of preliminary data on the rate andsuitability of referrals, engagement, and helpfulness, to inform futurelarger-scale implementation and evaluation.Method: We conducted a mixed-methods audit during the service’s first tenoperational months (01/09/2013 to 30/06/2014). Caregivers gavequalitative feedback and completed measures of the impact of caregivingpre- and post-intervention.Results: Referrals totalled 103 (10/month), with 45 (44%) initial meetings;and 28 (27%) individual interventions (≥1 sessions, mode=3). Caregiverswere predominantly black British/African/Caribbean parents. Self-reportedneeds and caregiving experiences were consistent with the literature. Two thirdsof caregivers were clinically distressed. Qualitative feedback showedthat caregivers valued the service. Outcomes suggest improvedexperiences of caregiving following intervention.Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential benefits and challenges ofroutinely providing psychologically-focused caregiver support. Limitationsand future plans are discussed.

AB - Background: Research demonstrates the importance of supportingcaregivers of people with psychosis, but routine implementation studies arelacking. We evaluate a newly-developed caregiver support service, offeringindividual and group psychoeducation, practical advice and emotionalsupport, working alongside usual community mental health provision forpeople with established psychosis.Aims: We aimed to provide analysis of preliminary data on the rate andsuitability of referrals, engagement, and helpfulness, to inform futurelarger-scale implementation and evaluation.Method: We conducted a mixed-methods audit during the service’s first tenoperational months (01/09/2013 to 30/06/2014). Caregivers gavequalitative feedback and completed measures of the impact of caregivingpre- and post-intervention.Results: Referrals totalled 103 (10/month), with 45 (44%) initial meetings;and 28 (27%) individual interventions (≥1 sessions, mode=3). Caregiverswere predominantly black British/African/Caribbean parents. Self-reportedneeds and caregiving experiences were consistent with the literature. Two thirdsof caregivers were clinically distressed. Qualitative feedback showedthat caregivers valued the service. Outcomes suggest improvedexperiences of caregiving following intervention.Conclusions: Findings highlight the potential benefits and challenges ofroutinely providing psychologically-focused caregiver support. Limitationsand future plans are discussed.

U2 - 10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647

DO - 10.1080/17522439.2016.1259647

M3 - Article

JO - Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches

JF - Psychosis-Psychological social and integrative approaches

SN - 1752-2439

ER -

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