King's College London

Research portal

Improving Interprofessional Attitudes Towards Mental and Physical Comorbidities: The Effectiveness of High Fidelity Simulation Training Versus Roleplay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Amina Saadi, Tasnim Uddin, Megan Fisher, Sean Cross, Chris Attoe

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume54
DOIs
PublishedMay 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: Teaching and training methods may be failing to keep up with complex healthcare needs and services. Simulation training is an innovative tool that can be used to train healthcare professions to manage interacting mental and physical health needs, and to improve care through interprofessional collaboration. However, the utilisation and evidence behind simulation training is lacking in relation to mental health care. This paper aims to compare the effects of simulation and roleplay training for mental-physical comorbidities on interprofessional attitudes. Methods: Participants took part in one of two courses: a simulation workshop (n = 29) or a didactic and roleplay-based course (n = 99). The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) scores were collected pre- and postcourse and compared by training course. Results: Simulation showed statistically significant improvements in attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration whereas the roleplay course highlighted no significant changes postcourse. Conclusions: Simulation is an effective educational and training tool that can be applied to mental healthcare and mental-physical comorbidities. Attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration can be improved more effectively through simulation training by increasing knowledge, understanding, and confidence.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454