Improving Peptide Fragmentation for Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Using a Time-Dependent Collision Energy Calculator

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is becoming a popular technique for interrogating biological systems. In recent years, advancements have been made to increase peptide coverage for proteins that resist digestion such as antibodies and membrane proteins. These methods commonly include using alternative digestion enzymes or longer chromatographic gradients, which may be expensive or time-consuming to implement. Here, we recommend an efficient proteomics-based approach to increase peptide confidence and coverage. A major filtering parameter for peptides in HDX is the number of product ions detected; this is a result of the collision energy (CE) applied within the MS. A traditional linear ramp achieves optimal CE for only short periods of time. More product ions will be created and detected if optimal CE can be achieved for a longer period of time. As a result, the coverage, redundancy, and data confidence are all increased. We achieved this by implementing a mobility-dependent CE look up table (LUT) which increases the CE as a function of mobility. We developed a program to calculate the optimal CE for a set of peptides and MS settings based on initial reference samples. We demonstrated the utility of the CE LUT on three protein samples including the soluble phosphorylase B, IgG2, and the membrane-stabilized AcrB. We showed that applying a CE LUT provided 8.5-50% more peptides compared to a linear CE ramp. The results demonstrate that a time-dependent CE LUT is a quick and inexpensive method to increase data confidence and peptide abundance for HDX-MS experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)996-999
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020

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