Increases in muscle volume after plantarflexor strength training in children with spastic cerebral palsy

Anne E. McNee, Martin Gough, Matt C. Morrissey, Adam P. Shortland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) have small, weak muscles. However, change inmuscle size due to resistance training in this group is unknown. We investigated the effect of plantarflexor strengthening on muscle volume, gait, and function in 13 ambulant children with spastic CP (seven males, six females; mean age 10y 11mo, SD 3y 0mo, range 6y 11mo-16y 11mo; eight with diplegia, five with hemiplegia; Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, six; level II, five; level III, two). Assessments were performed before training, 5 and 10 weeks into training, and at a 3-month follow-up. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes were computed from three-dimensional ultrasound images. The number of unilateral heel raises able to be achieved on each side was assessed. Function was measured using three-dimensional gait analysis, the 'timed up and go' test, the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, and the Functional Mobility Scale. Training involved heel raises or Thera-Band resistance, 4 times a week for 10 weeks. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius volumes increased by 17 and 14% at week 5 (p=0.03, p=0.028). This increase was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (medial gastrocnemius p=0.001, p <0.001; lateral gastrocnemius p=0.006, p=0.007). Heel raises (mean number) increased by week 5 (p=0.002). This was maintained at week 10 and follow-up (p <0.001; p <0.001). No significant change in measured function was observed. Muscle volume increased in response to training in children with spastic CP. The role of progressive strength training in maintaining long-term function is discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429 - 435
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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