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Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio

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Inequality and the Tails : The Palma Proposition and Ratio. / Cobham, Alex; Schlögl, Lukas; Sumner, Andy.

In: Global Policy, Vol. 7, No. 1, 02.2016, p. 25-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cobham, A, Schlögl, L & Sumner, A 2016, 'Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio', Global Policy, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 25-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12320

APA

Cobham, A., Schlögl, L., & Sumner, A. (2016). Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio. Global Policy, 7(1), 25-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12320

Vancouver

Cobham A, Schlögl L, Sumner A. Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio. Global Policy. 2016 Feb;7(1):25-36. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12320

Author

Cobham, Alex ; Schlögl, Lukas ; Sumner, Andy. / Inequality and the Tails : The Palma Proposition and Ratio. In: Global Policy. 2016 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 25-36.

Bibtex Download

@article{10587b1c0e594cdc8a77ce476fec219a,
title = "Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio",
abstract = "The Palma Proposition is that changes in income or consumption inequality are (almost) exclusively due to changes in the share of the richest 10 per cent and poorest 40 per cent because the 'middle' group between the richest and poorest tend do capture approximately 50 per cent of gross national income (GNI). The Palma Ratio is a measure of income or consumption concentration based on the above-mentioned proposition and calculated as the GNI capture of the richest 10 per cent divided by that of the poorest 40 per cent. In this paper we revisit the empirical basis of the Palma Proposition (the relative stability of the 'middle') with a new and expanded data set across and within developing and developed countries. We find the data reaffirms the Palma Proposition and that the proposition is getting stronger over time.",
author = "Alex Cobham and Lukas Schl{\"o}gl and Andy Sumner",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/1758-5899.12320",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "25--36",
journal = "Global Policy",
issn = "1758-5899",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inequality and the Tails

T2 - The Palma Proposition and Ratio

AU - Cobham, Alex

AU - Schlögl, Lukas

AU - Sumner, Andy

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - The Palma Proposition is that changes in income or consumption inequality are (almost) exclusively due to changes in the share of the richest 10 per cent and poorest 40 per cent because the 'middle' group between the richest and poorest tend do capture approximately 50 per cent of gross national income (GNI). The Palma Ratio is a measure of income or consumption concentration based on the above-mentioned proposition and calculated as the GNI capture of the richest 10 per cent divided by that of the poorest 40 per cent. In this paper we revisit the empirical basis of the Palma Proposition (the relative stability of the 'middle') with a new and expanded data set across and within developing and developed countries. We find the data reaffirms the Palma Proposition and that the proposition is getting stronger over time.

AB - The Palma Proposition is that changes in income or consumption inequality are (almost) exclusively due to changes in the share of the richest 10 per cent and poorest 40 per cent because the 'middle' group between the richest and poorest tend do capture approximately 50 per cent of gross national income (GNI). The Palma Ratio is a measure of income or consumption concentration based on the above-mentioned proposition and calculated as the GNI capture of the richest 10 per cent divided by that of the poorest 40 per cent. In this paper we revisit the empirical basis of the Palma Proposition (the relative stability of the 'middle') with a new and expanded data set across and within developing and developed countries. We find the data reaffirms the Palma Proposition and that the proposition is getting stronger over time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959064552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1758-5899.12320

DO - 10.1111/1758-5899.12320

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84959064552

VL - 7

SP - 25

EP - 36

JO - Global Policy

JF - Global Policy

SN - 1758-5899

IS - 1

ER -

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