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Inflammatory bowel disease nurses' views on taking on a new role to support an online self-management programme for symptoms of fatigue, pain and urgency: a qualitative study to maximise intervention acceptance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-35
Number of pages8
JournalGastrointestinal Nursing
Volume19
Issue number9
Early online date2 Nov 2021
DOIs
Accepted/In press12 Jul 2021
E-pub ahead of print2 Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: Acknowledgement This work was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Programme Grants for Applied Research; the views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care Publisher Copyright: © 2021 MA Healthcare Ltd. All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: Patients can be empowered through self-managing their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) symptoms. It is important to understand how specialist IBD nurses can practically support patients to do this. Aim: To explore the perceptions of IBD specialist nurses about the implementation of a proposed nurse-guided online cognitive behavioural self-management intervention to manage symptoms of fatigue, pain and urgency. Methods: Five semi-tructured focus groups (45 participants) were conducted with IBD nurses, and themes were identified through hematic analysis. Findings: Four themes were identified: (1) role of nurse as a facilitator; (2) nurse competence in facilitating the intervention; (3) nurse perception of patient needs; and (4) intervention implementation. Conclusions: The results of this study helped to refine the proposed guided online intervention with a view to sustainable implementation in clinical practice. Refinements included in-depth training and minimisation of additional workload for nurses through reducing patient contact, including an online messaging system for communication with patients.

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