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Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface

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Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface. / Lavelle, Anna M.; Bury, Nic R.; O'Shea, Francis T.; Chadwick, Michael A.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 3, e0212690, 13.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Lavelle, AM, Bury, NR, O'Shea, FT & Chadwick, MA 2019, 'Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface', PloS one, vol. 14, no. 3, e0212690. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212690

APA

Lavelle, A. M., Bury, N. R., O'Shea, F. T., & Chadwick, M. A. (2019). Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface. PloS one, 14(3), [e0212690]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212690

Vancouver

Lavelle AM, Bury NR, O'Shea FT, Chadwick MA. Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface. PloS one. 2019 Mar 13;14(3). e0212690. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212690

Author

Lavelle, Anna M. ; Bury, Nic R. ; O'Shea, Francis T. ; Chadwick, Michael A. / Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 3.

Bibtex Download

@article{363c7e9a425b488f90cedbdb0d615e21,
title = "Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface",
abstract = "River restoration projects focused on increasing flow heterogeneity and channel biodiversity through use of in-channel structures can facilitate ecosystem services which promote nitrogen (N) storage and reduce eutrophication, essential aspects of N dynamics in streams. In this study we use small flux chambers to examine ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) cycling across the sediment-water interface. Paired restored and unrestored study sites in 5 urban tributaries of the River Thames in Greater London were used to examine N dynamics following physical disturbances (0-3 min exposures) and subsequent biogeochemical activity (3-10 min exposures). Average ambient NH4+ concentrations ranged from 28.0 to 731.7 μg l-1 among all sites, with the highest concentrations occurring at restored sites overall. Average NO3- concentrations ranged from 9.6 to 26.4 mg l-1 but did not differ between restored and unrestored sites (p=0.10). Average NH4+ fluxes at restored sites ranged from -11.5 to 6.5 μg m-2 sec-1, however restoration did not significantly influence NH4+ uptake or regeneration rates between 0-3 minutes and 3-10 minutes. However average NO3- uptake fluxes among sites responded significantly to physical disturbances ranging from -148.8 to 432.6 μg m-2 sec-1. Neither NH4+ nor NO3- fluxes were significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), total organic matter (TOM) or sediment grain size. We attributed variations in overall N fluxes to N-specific sediment storage capacity, biogeochemical transformations and potential legacy effects associated with urban pollution. It is clear that a greater understanding of mechanisms driving the dynamic transfer, processing, and removal of NH4+ and NO3- in urban river systems is required for informing future river restoration strategies.",
author = "Lavelle, {Anna M.} and Bury, {Nic R.} and O'Shea, {Francis T.} and Chadwick, {Michael A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0212690",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "PloS one",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of urban river restoration on nitrogen dynamics at the sediment-water interface

AU - Lavelle, Anna M.

AU - Bury, Nic R.

AU - O'Shea, Francis T.

AU - Chadwick, Michael A.

PY - 2019/3/13

Y1 - 2019/3/13

N2 - River restoration projects focused on increasing flow heterogeneity and channel biodiversity through use of in-channel structures can facilitate ecosystem services which promote nitrogen (N) storage and reduce eutrophication, essential aspects of N dynamics in streams. In this study we use small flux chambers to examine ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) cycling across the sediment-water interface. Paired restored and unrestored study sites in 5 urban tributaries of the River Thames in Greater London were used to examine N dynamics following physical disturbances (0-3 min exposures) and subsequent biogeochemical activity (3-10 min exposures). Average ambient NH4+ concentrations ranged from 28.0 to 731.7 μg l-1 among all sites, with the highest concentrations occurring at restored sites overall. Average NO3- concentrations ranged from 9.6 to 26.4 mg l-1 but did not differ between restored and unrestored sites (p=0.10). Average NH4+ fluxes at restored sites ranged from -11.5 to 6.5 μg m-2 sec-1, however restoration did not significantly influence NH4+ uptake or regeneration rates between 0-3 minutes and 3-10 minutes. However average NO3- uptake fluxes among sites responded significantly to physical disturbances ranging from -148.8 to 432.6 μg m-2 sec-1. Neither NH4+ nor NO3- fluxes were significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), total organic matter (TOM) or sediment grain size. We attributed variations in overall N fluxes to N-specific sediment storage capacity, biogeochemical transformations and potential legacy effects associated with urban pollution. It is clear that a greater understanding of mechanisms driving the dynamic transfer, processing, and removal of NH4+ and NO3- in urban river systems is required for informing future river restoration strategies.

AB - River restoration projects focused on increasing flow heterogeneity and channel biodiversity through use of in-channel structures can facilitate ecosystem services which promote nitrogen (N) storage and reduce eutrophication, essential aspects of N dynamics in streams. In this study we use small flux chambers to examine ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) cycling across the sediment-water interface. Paired restored and unrestored study sites in 5 urban tributaries of the River Thames in Greater London were used to examine N dynamics following physical disturbances (0-3 min exposures) and subsequent biogeochemical activity (3-10 min exposures). Average ambient NH4+ concentrations ranged from 28.0 to 731.7 μg l-1 among all sites, with the highest concentrations occurring at restored sites overall. Average NO3- concentrations ranged from 9.6 to 26.4 mg l-1 but did not differ between restored and unrestored sites (p=0.10). Average NH4+ fluxes at restored sites ranged from -11.5 to 6.5 μg m-2 sec-1, however restoration did not significantly influence NH4+ uptake or regeneration rates between 0-3 minutes and 3-10 minutes. However average NO3- uptake fluxes among sites responded significantly to physical disturbances ranging from -148.8 to 432.6 μg m-2 sec-1. Neither NH4+ nor NO3- fluxes were significantly correlated with chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), total organic matter (TOM) or sediment grain size. We attributed variations in overall N fluxes to N-specific sediment storage capacity, biogeochemical transformations and potential legacy effects associated with urban pollution. It is clear that a greater understanding of mechanisms driving the dynamic transfer, processing, and removal of NH4+ and NO3- in urban river systems is required for informing future river restoration strategies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062835160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0212690

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0212690

M3 - Article

VL - 14

JO - PloS one

JF - PloS one

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 3

M1 - e0212690

ER -

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