King's College London

Research portal

Informal caregiving and physical activity among 204,315 adults in 38 low- and middle-income countries: A cross-sectional study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Louis Jacob, Lee Smith, Sarah E Jackson, Jae Il Shin, Josep Maria Haro, Davy Vancampfort, Brendon Stubbs, Ai Koyanagi

Original languageEnglish
Article number106007
Pages (from-to)106007
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume132
Early online date27 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Documents

King's Authors

Abstract

Data on the association between informal caregiving and physical activity (PA) levels are scarce, especially from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Furthermore, previous research has yielded conflicting results. Thus, we investigated this association in adults from 38 LMICs. Data from the World Health Survey (WHS), a cross-sectional, predominantly nationally representative survey conducted in 2002-2004, were analyzed. PA was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and participants were dichotomized into those who do (≥150 min of moderate-to-vigorous PA per week) and do not (<150 min = low PA) comply with the World Health Organization PA recommendations. Those who provided help to a relative or friend (adult or child), because this person has a long-term physical or mental illness or disability, or is getting old and weak in the past year were considered to be informal caregivers. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the associations. There were 204,315 adults aged ≥18 years from 38 LMICs included in this study [mean (standard deviation) age 38.6 (16.1) years; 50.7% female]. Overall, the prevalence of caregiving and low PA was 19.5% and 29.9%, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, caregivers were at a lower risk for low PA compared to non-caregivers (OR = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.72-0.86). Engagement in greater number of caregiving activities was associated with lower odds for low PA dose-dependently. Informal caregiving was associated with higher levels of PA in adults in LMICs. Future studies of longitudinal design are warranted to understand causality and the underlying mechanisms of this association.

Download statistics

No data available

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454