Abstract

Background:
Insight into illness is often used in clinical and legal contexts, for example, as evidence of decision-making capacity. However, it is unclear whether this disadvantages certain groups protected under equality legislation. To our knowledge, this question has yet to be addressed systematically. Therefore, the present study reviews empirical studies that look at the relationship between insight and sociodemographic variables.

Methods:
A systematic search of six bibliographic databases (CENTRAL, CINAHL, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO) was conducted, which yielded 6,192 results. Study characteristics and outcomes (associations between insight and socio-demographic variables) were then extracted from 207 eligible studies. This included protected characteristics under the Equality Act (2010): age, sex, ethnicity, marital status and religion. Weighted confidence estimates were calculated and relevant moderators included in a random effects meta-analysis. A study protocol was registered prospectively on PROSPERO, ID: CRD42019120117.

Results:
Insight was not strongly associated with any sociodemographic variable. Better insight was weakly but significantly associated with white ethnicity, being employed, younger age and more years of education. The age associations were mostly explained by relevant moderating variables. For people with schizophrenia, the associations between sociodemographic variables and insight were comparable to associations with decision making capacity.

Conclusions:
Our results suggest that insight is not strongly associated with any sociodemographic variables. Further research is needed to clarify potential associations, particularly with non-white ethnicity and proxies for social support.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Social Psychiatry
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Aug 2021

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