Instruments of Medical Information: The Rise of the Medical Trade Catalog in Britain, 1750-1914

Claire L. Jones*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent interest in our current information age has provided scholars in a wide range of disciplines with increasing impetus to study the origins and development of a variety of forms of printed and non-printed media. This article addresses the rise of a largely neglected but significant non-literary form of print within the medical trade between 1750 and 1914: the mail-order catalog. It focuses on the development of the physical form of the publication—from attractive book of display to commercial mail-order catalog—to highlight economic, technological and professional changes within and beyond the field of medicine. As a result of such changes, catalogs became an increasingly important technology of medical information used by medical and surgical instrument makers to access and control markets of late-eighteenth, nineteenth, and early-twentieth century medical practitioners on local, national, and international scales.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)563-599
Number of pages37
JournalTECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE
Volume54
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • TECHNOLOGY
  • ENGLAND
  • REVOLUTION
  • ORIGINS
  • SOCIETY
  • LONDON

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