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Interpreting 2D Materials Bio-Nano Interactions: Influence of Aggregation Status, Protein Corona, Cell Culture Media, and Cell Types

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number2100251
Number of pages1
Journaladvanced materials interfaces
Volume8
Issue number17
Early online date12 Aug 2021
DOIs
Accepted/In press2021
E-pub ahead of print12 Aug 2021
Published9 Sep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: K.‐C.M. is supported by Graduate School International Research Award and King's Global Research Grant (King's College London). P.M.C. is a Sir Henry Wellcome Post‐doctoral fellow (WT103913, Wellcome Trust, UK). SR‐FTIR experiments were performed at MIRAS beamline at ALBA Synchrotron with the collaboration of ALBA staff. Funding Information: K.-C.M. is supported by Graduate School International Research Award and King's Global Research Grant (King's College London). P.M.C. is a Sir Henry Wellcome Post-doctoral fellow (WT103913, Wellcome Trust, UK). SR-FTIR experiments were performed at MIRAS beamline at ALBA Synchrotron with the collaboration of ALBA staff. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Advanced Materials Interfaces published by Wiley-VCH GmbH Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Huge interests have been drawn to 2D nanomaterials for biomedical applications; however, the 2D bio-nano interface is largely dependent on the biological environment. Hard protein corona (HC)-dependent bio-nano interactions are highly sensitive to material surface functional group changes. Alterations in HC change the colloidal stability of the nanomaterials hence changes the material presentation to cells, which ultimately affect bio-nano interactions. Here graphene oxide (GO) is used as an exemplar 2D platform to investigate HC-dependent and colloidal stability-dependent bio-nano interactions on contrasting non-phagocytic A549 cells and phagocytic J774 cells, using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and principal components analysis (PCA) of cellular IR spectra obtained by label-free synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform IR microspectroscopy (SR-FTIR).

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