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Is artificial reproductive technology a risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity independent of the generation of multiple births?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lucy Barker, Catey Bunce, Shahid Husain, Gill G W Adams

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-178
JournalEuropean Journal of Ophthalmology
Early online date16 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Mar 2017

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Abstract

PURPOSE: There is some debate regarding whether artificial reproductive technology (ART) constitutes an independent risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). We wanted to assess the prevalence of ART in multiple birth infants seen for ROP screening and whether or not ROP was identified or treated, in order to evaluate whether ART contributes a risk factor for ROP independent of the generation of multiple births.

METHODS: A retrospective audit was performed of all multiple birth babies admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit who met the UK ROP screening criteria (<32 weeks gestational age [GA] and/or <1,501 g birthweight [BW]).

RESULTS: A total of 205 babies met our criteria, of whom 87.3% were twins. A total of 39.5% were born following ART. A total of 30.5% of the non-ART group developed ROP vs 34% of the ART group (p = 0.837). Stage 3 ROP developed in 5.1% of non-ART babies and 6% of ART babies. A total of 8.5% of non-ART babies and 10% of ART babies required treatment for ROP. Logistic regression demonstrated that ART was not independently associated with development of ROP.

CONCLUSIONS: Artificial reproductive technology multiple birth babies make up a considerable proportion of the ROP screening burden and their number is likely to increase as ART is increasingly available and utilized. We found no significant difference between the numbers of babies developing ROP in the ART vs non-ART groups, but the numbers are small. The estimated odds of developing ROP are slightly higher in the ART babies, so our data do not rule out a possible association.

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