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Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis

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Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis. / Wilson, C.; Newham, J.; Rankin, J. et al.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 4, 06.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Wilson, C, Newham, J, Rankin, J, Ismail, K, Simonoff, E, Reynolds, RM, Stoll, N & Howard, LM 2019, 'Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis', Diabetic Medicine, vol. 37, no. 4. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14170

APA

Wilson, C., Newham, J., Rankin, J., Ismail, K., Simonoff, E., Reynolds, R. M., Stoll, N., & Howard, L. M. (2019). Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis. Diabetic Medicine, 37(4). https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14170

Vancouver

Wilson C, Newham J, Rankin J, Ismail K, Simonoff E, Reynolds RM et al. Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis. Diabetic Medicine. 2019 Nov 6;37(4). https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14170

Author

Wilson, C. ; Newham, J. ; Rankin, J. et al. / Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis. In: Diabetic Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 4.

Bibtex Download

@article{9a4b7ff6848745afa57d9bee7a823eff,
title = "Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis",
abstract = "AimGestational diabetes (GDM) and mental disorder are common perinatal morbidities and are associated with adverse maternal and child outcomes. While there is a relationship between type 2 diabetes and mental disorder, the relationship between GDM and mental disorder has been less studied. We conducted a systematic review and meta‐analysis of the prevalence of mental disorders in women with GDM and their risk for mental disorders compared with women without GDM.MethodsPublished, peer‐reviewed literature measuring prevalence and/or odds of GDM and perinatal mental disorders was reviewed systematically. Risk of bias was assessed using a checklist. Two independent reviewers were involved. Analyses were grouped by stage of peripartum, i.e. antepartum at the time of GDM diagnosis and after diagnosis, and in the postpartum.ResultsSixty‐two studies were included. There was an increased risk of depressive symptoms in the antenatal period around the time of diagnosis of GDM [odds ratio (OR) 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42, 3.05] and in the postnatal period (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.26, 2.00).ConclusionsGiven the potential relationship between GDM and perinatal mental disorders, integration of physical and mental healthcare in women experiencing GDM and mental disorders could improve short‐ and long‐term outcomes for women and their children.",
author = "C. Wilson and J. Newham and J. Rankin and K. Ismail and Emily Simonoff and R.M. Reynolds and N. Stoll and L.M. Howard",
note = "Funding Information: CW carried out this work as part of a Medical Research Council (MRC) funded Clinical Research Training Fellowship (MR/P019293/1). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2019 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1111/dme.14170",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine",
issn = "0742-3071",
publisher = "Blackwell Publishing",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is there an increased risk of perinatal mental disorder in women with gestational diabetes? A systematic review and meta‐analysis

AU - Wilson, C.

AU - Newham, J.

AU - Rankin, J.

AU - Ismail, K.

AU - Simonoff, Emily

AU - Reynolds, R.M.

AU - Stoll, N.

AU - Howard, L.M.

N1 - Funding Information: CW carried out this work as part of a Medical Research Council (MRC) funded Clinical Research Training Fellowship (MR/P019293/1). Publisher Copyright: © 2019 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK

PY - 2019/11/6

Y1 - 2019/11/6

N2 - AimGestational diabetes (GDM) and mental disorder are common perinatal morbidities and are associated with adverse maternal and child outcomes. While there is a relationship between type 2 diabetes and mental disorder, the relationship between GDM and mental disorder has been less studied. We conducted a systematic review and meta‐analysis of the prevalence of mental disorders in women with GDM and their risk for mental disorders compared with women without GDM.MethodsPublished, peer‐reviewed literature measuring prevalence and/or odds of GDM and perinatal mental disorders was reviewed systematically. Risk of bias was assessed using a checklist. Two independent reviewers were involved. Analyses were grouped by stage of peripartum, i.e. antepartum at the time of GDM diagnosis and after diagnosis, and in the postpartum.ResultsSixty‐two studies were included. There was an increased risk of depressive symptoms in the antenatal period around the time of diagnosis of GDM [odds ratio (OR) 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42, 3.05] and in the postnatal period (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.26, 2.00).ConclusionsGiven the potential relationship between GDM and perinatal mental disorders, integration of physical and mental healthcare in women experiencing GDM and mental disorders could improve short‐ and long‐term outcomes for women and their children.

AB - AimGestational diabetes (GDM) and mental disorder are common perinatal morbidities and are associated with adverse maternal and child outcomes. While there is a relationship between type 2 diabetes and mental disorder, the relationship between GDM and mental disorder has been less studied. We conducted a systematic review and meta‐analysis of the prevalence of mental disorders in women with GDM and their risk for mental disorders compared with women without GDM.MethodsPublished, peer‐reviewed literature measuring prevalence and/or odds of GDM and perinatal mental disorders was reviewed systematically. Risk of bias was assessed using a checklist. Two independent reviewers were involved. Analyses were grouped by stage of peripartum, i.e. antepartum at the time of GDM diagnosis and after diagnosis, and in the postpartum.ResultsSixty‐two studies were included. There was an increased risk of depressive symptoms in the antenatal period around the time of diagnosis of GDM [odds ratio (OR) 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42, 3.05] and in the postnatal period (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.26, 2.00).ConclusionsGiven the potential relationship between GDM and perinatal mental disorders, integration of physical and mental healthcare in women experiencing GDM and mental disorders could improve short‐ and long‐term outcomes for women and their children.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075735274&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dme.14170

DO - 10.1111/dme.14170

M3 - Article

VL - 37

JO - Diabetic Medicine

JF - Diabetic Medicine

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 4

ER -

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