Later retirement, job strain, and health: Evidence from the new State Pension age in the United Kingdom

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Abstract

This paper examines the impact of raising the State Pension age on women’s health. Exploiting a UK pension reform that increased women’s State Pension age for up to six years since 2010, we show that rising the State Pension age leads to an increase of up to 12 percentage points in the probability of depressive symptoms, alongside an increase in self-reported medically diagnosed depression among women in a lower occupational grade. Our results suggest that these effects are driven by prolonged exposure to high-strain jobs characterised by high demands and low control. Effects are consistent across multiple sub-components of the General Health Question (GHQ) and SF-12 scores, and robust to alternative empirical specifications, including ‘placebo’ analyses for women who never worked and for men.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)891-912
Number of pages22
JournalHealth Economics
Volume29
Issue number8
Early online date12 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Social Security
  • Public Pensions
  • Economics of ageing
  • Public Health
  • Understanding Society

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