Limitations in the evidential basis supporting health benefits from a decreased exposure to pesticides through organic food consumption

Robin Mesnage*, Ioannis N. Tsakiris, Michael N. Antoniou, Aristides Tsatsakis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumer demand for organic food is mostly based on the belief that organic products are healthier because they are less contaminated with pesticides. We explain why health benefits from a decreased exposure to pesticides through organic food consumption remain unsubstantiated. There is sufficient evidence to conclude that nonorganic food products contain higher levels of synthetic pesticides. However, a link between the consumption of an organic diet with health benefits is confounded by a number of lifestyle and demographic covariates. We recommend dietary intervention studies be conducted such as randomized double-blind placebo-controlled investigations to determine if a group of individuals consuming an organic wholefood diet or an equivalent nonorganic diet present any differences in health status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-55
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Toxicology
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2020

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