Longitudinal study of cardiometabolic risk from early adolescence to early adulthood in an ethnically diverse cohort

Seeromanie Harding*, Maria Joao Silva, Oarabile R. Molaodi, Zinat E. Enayat, Aidan Cassidy, Alexis Karamanos, Ursula M. Read, J. Kennedy Cruickshank

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine influences of adiposity from early adolescence to early 20s on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in the multiethnic Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) longitudinal study. Methods: In 2002-2003, 6643 11-13-year-olds from 51 London schools participated at baseline, and 4785 were seen again at 14-16 years. Recently, 665 (97% of invited) participated in pilot follow-up at 21-23 years, with biological and psychosocial measures and blood biomarkers (only at 21-23 years). Regression models examined interplay between ethnicity, adiposity and CVD. Results: At 21-23 years, ∼30-40% were overweight. About half of the sample had completed a degree with little ethnic variation despite more socioeconomic disadvantage in adolescence among ethnic minorities. Regardless of ethnicity, overweight increased more steeply between 14-16 years and 21-23 years than between 11-13 years and 14-16 years. More overweight among Black Caribbean and Black African females, lower systolic blood pressure (sBP) among Indian females and Pakistani/Bangladeshi males compared with White UK peers, persisted from 11- 13 years. At 21-23 years, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was higher among Black Caribbean females, total cholesterol higher and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol lower among Pakistani/Bangladeshis. Overweight was associated with a ∼+2 mm Hg rise in sBP between 11-13 years and 21-23 years. Adiposity measures at 11-13 years were related to allostatic load (a cluster of several risk markers), HbA1c and HDL cholesterol at 21-23 years. Ethnic patterns in CVD biomarkers remained after adjustments. Conclusions: Adolescent adiposity posed significant risks at 21-23 years, a period in the lifespan generally ignored in cardiovascular studies, when ethnic/gender variations in CVD are already apparent.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere013221
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

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