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LONG-TERM TRENDS IN SURVIVAL AFTER HAEMORRHAGIC STROKES: THE SOUTH LONDON STROKE REGISTER

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Original languageEnglish
Article number00316/#1708
Pages (from-to)86-86
JournalInternational Journal Of Stroke
Volume15
Issue number1_suppl
DOIs
Published7 Nov 2020

King's Authors

Abstract

Background And Aims: There have been reductions in stroke mortality over the past decades but estimates by subtypes are limited. This study estimates time-trends in mortality by haemorrhagic stroke (HS) subtypes over a 16-year period.

Methods: The study area was 357,308 in 2011; 50.4% were males, 56% were white, and 25% of black ethnic backgrounds. People who had their first-ever HS during 2000–2015 were identified and classified according to the underlying mechanism into: intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Time-trends in survival were examined using proportional-hazards survival modelling, adjusted for demography, pre-stroke risk factors, case mix variables, and processes of care.

Results: A total of 715 patients with first-ever HSs were registered. The median age was 61.9 years; 45.7% were females, 55.5% were white, 30.1% were black, and 14.4% of other ethnic groups. Between 2000 and 2015, the adjusted overall mortality decreased by 38.9% (hazard ratio [HR] per year, 0.951; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.923–0.981). Mortality reductions were noted in both types of HSs but were only significant in females (HR per year, 0.937; 95% CI, 0.892–0.984), patients aged ˂65 years (HR per year, 0.927; 95% CI, 0.881–0.975) and the white population (HR per year, 0.938; 95% CI, 0.902–0.975). Fewer number of events in certain subgroups (e.g., SAH) could have led to insufficient power to detect significant trends.

Conclusions: Mortality after HS has decreased by an annual average of around 4.9% during 2000–2015. Such reductions were particularly evident in females, patients aged ˂65 years and the white population.

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