Management of compromised first permanent molars in a cohort of UK paediatric patients referred to hospital‐based services

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Abstract

Background: There are diverse opinions among dentists about managing compromised first permanent molars (cFPMs) in children and a perceived lack of guidance to help them evaluate prognosis. Aim: To evaluate the current management of cFPM in children referred to a UK hospital centre and to report the severity of the affected teeth. Design: A service evaluation was undertaken, based on case records of medically fit children (6-11 years) referred to for the management of cFPMs. The presence of hypomineralisation, post-eruptive breakdown and the proposed care plans were recorded. Radiographic signs of severity were scored using the ICDAS index (intra/inter-rater kappa 0.96/0.82). Results: From 349 records screened over a 4-month period, 249 met the selection criteria. Almost 81% were planned to have extraction of at least one cFPM, whereas 19.3% were managed without extraction. More than half of the extraction cases (n = 105) had radiographic radiolucencies not exceeding the middle third of dentine in the worst-affected FPM. At the time of extraction, the mean age of the patients was 9.8 years (±0.9). GA was used in 196 (97.5%) cases, and 40.8% had not received previous treatment in any of their cFPMs. Conclusion: Potentially restorable cFPMs in children is, most of the time, in a cohort of UK patients referred for tier 3 services, being managed by timed extractions under general anasethesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)724-736
Number of pages13
JournalInternational journal of paediatric dentistry / the British Paedodontic Society [and] the International Association of Dentistry for Children
Volume32
Issue number5
Early online date15 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2022

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