Management of stones in renal transplant

Kathie A. Wong, Jonathon Olsburgh*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose of review

    Increasingly, screening of both deceased and living donor organs has led to the early detection of kidney stones prior to donation. A number of transplant recipients will still present with donor-gifted and de-novo stones. A range of treatment modalities is available in the management of renal transplant stones.

    Recent findings

    Stones can be pretreated in the (living) donor prior to transplantation, managed at the time of transplantation or treated in the recipient post-transplant. The options include conservative management, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or open surgery depending on the size and location of the stone(s). Various techniques to deal with a transplant kidney are described. Ex-vivo ureteroscopy or pyeloscopy can safely render a kidney-stone free prior to transplantation and in living donors this means without subjecting the living donor to an additional stone removing procedure.

    Summary

    The cause of renal transplant lithiasis is multifactorial. More research is needed to understand the factors associated with de-novo stone formation. Early detection of donor-gifted stones can allow stones to be removed at the time of transplantation. Close follow up of both living donors and transplant recipients is necessary to ensure long-term safety is maintained.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)175-179
    Number of pages5
    JournalCURRENT OPINION IN UROLOGY
    Volume23
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    Keywords

    • de-novo lithiasis
    • donor-gifted stones
    • ex-vivo ureteroscopy
    • renal transplant lithiasis
    • LIVE DONOR NEPHRECTOMY
    • EX-VIVO URETEROSCOPY
    • OF-THE-LITERATURE
    • KIDNEY-TRANSPLANTATION
    • TERTIARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM
    • GRAFT LITHIASIS
    • UROLITHIASIS
    • HYPERURICEMIA
    • PREVALENCE
    • RISK

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