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Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

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Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure. / Iliopoulos, Costas S.; Okanlawon, Tewogboye A.; Pissis, Solon P.; Tischler, German.

Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference. 2010. p. 1-4.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Harvard

Iliopoulos, CS, Okanlawon, TA, Pissis, SP & Tischler, G 2010, Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure. in Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference. pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792

APA

Iliopoulos, C. S., Okanlawon, T. A., Pissis, S. P., & Tischler, G. (2010). Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure. In Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference (pp. 1-4) https://doi.org/10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792

Vancouver

Iliopoulos CS, Okanlawon TA, Pissis SP, Tischler G. Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure. In Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference. 2010. p. 1-4 https://doi.org/10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792

Author

Iliopoulos, Costas S. ; Okanlawon, Tewogboye A. ; Pissis, Solon P. ; Tischler, German. / Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure. Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference. 2010. pp. 1-4

Bibtex Download

@inbook{c435cb3e8330405a8a8c92521dd36cc9,
title = "Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure",
abstract = "The constant advances in sequencing technology are turning whole-genome sequencing into a routine procedure, resulting in massive amounts of data that need to be processed. Tens of gigabytes of data in the form of short reads need to be mapped back to reference sequences, a few gigabases long. These high-throughput (or next-generation) technologies allow researchers to characterise a bacterial genome during a single experiment and at a moderate cost. In this paper, as most of the bacteria have a single circular chromosome, we present a simple, yet efficient, accurate and consistent algorithm, to solve the practical problem of matching millions of short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure.",
author = "Iliopoulos, {Costas S.} and Okanlawon, {Tewogboye A.} and Pissis, {Solon P.} and German Tischler",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792",
language = "Undefined/Unknown",
pages = "1--4",
booktitle = "Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Mapping short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure

AU - Iliopoulos, Costas S.

AU - Okanlawon, Tewogboye A.

AU - Pissis, Solon P.

AU - Tischler, German

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The constant advances in sequencing technology are turning whole-genome sequencing into a routine procedure, resulting in massive amounts of data that need to be processed. Tens of gigabytes of data in the form of short reads need to be mapped back to reference sequences, a few gigabases long. These high-throughput (or next-generation) technologies allow researchers to characterise a bacterial genome during a single experiment and at a moderate cost. In this paper, as most of the bacteria have a single circular chromosome, we present a simple, yet efficient, accurate and consistent algorithm, to solve the practical problem of matching millions of short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure.

AB - The constant advances in sequencing technology are turning whole-genome sequencing into a routine procedure, resulting in massive amounts of data that need to be processed. Tens of gigabytes of data in the form of short reads need to be mapped back to reference sequences, a few gigabases long. These high-throughput (or next-generation) technologies allow researchers to characterise a bacterial genome during a single experiment and at a moderate cost. In this paper, as most of the bacteria have a single circular chromosome, we present a simple, yet efficient, accurate and consistent algorithm, to solve the practical problem of matching millions of short reads to a genomic sequence with circular structure.

U2 - 10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792

DO - 10.1109/ITAB.2010.5687792

M3 - Conference paper

SP - 1

EP - 4

BT - Information Technology and Applications in Biomedicine (ITAB), 2010 10th IEEE International Conference

ER -

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