Maternal smoking and cannabis use during pregnancy and infant outcomes

Sarah Sturrock, Emma Williams, Hemant Ambulkar, Theodore Dassios, Anne Greenough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)
56 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background

Our aim was to determine the prevalence of tobacco smoking and e-cigarettes and cannabis use during pregnancy, whether these were influenced by ethnicity, and their relationship to perinatal outcomes.

Methods

A study was carried out in 4465 infants whose mothers delivered during 2017 and 2018. Self-reported maternal smoking, e-cigarette and cannabis use at booking were recorded. Outcome measures were birthweight and head circumference z-scores and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Results

Two hundred and five women reported smoking cigarettes (4.7%), five were using e-cigarettes (0.11%) and 106 were using cannabis (2.43%). Women were most likely to smoke if young (15–19 years old) or from a mixed-race or White background. Cigarette smoking was associated with a lower mean z-score for birthweight (−0.587 vs. −0.064) and head circumference (−0.782 vs. −0.157) (both outcomes P < 0.0001). Young, mixed-race women were most likely to be both smoking and using cannabis during pregnancy and their infants had a lower birthweight mean z score (−0.989 vs. −0.587, P = 0.028) and head circumference z score (−1.33 vs. 0.782, P = 0.025) than cigarette use alone.

Conclusion

Young, mixed-race women were most likely to be both smoking and using cannabis during pregnancy and should be targeted for cessation programmes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Perinatal Medicine
Early online date11 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • cigarette smoking; cannabis; e-cigarettes; birth weight; head circumference

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