Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Luc Lecavalier, Jeffrey J. Wood, Alycia K. Halladay, Nancy E. Jones, Michael G. Aman, Edwin H. Cook, Benjamin L. Handen, Bryan H. King, Deborah A. Pearson, Victoria Hallett, Katherine Anne Sullivan, Sabrina Grondhuis, Somer L. Bishop, Joseph P. Horrigan, Geraldine Dawson, Lawrence Scahill*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in youth with ASD. To complete the review, the panel held monthly conference calls and two face-to-face meetings over a fourteen-month period. Thirty eight published studies were reviewed and ten assessment measures were examined: four were deemed appropriate for use in clinical trials, although with conditions; three were judged to be potentially appropriate, while three were considered not useful for clinical trials assessing anxiety. Despite recent advances, additional relevant, reliable and valid outcome measures are needed to evaluate treatments for anxiety in ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1128-1143
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Anxiety
  • Instrument
  • Measure
  • Assessment
  • Treatment
  • Intervention
  • PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
  • COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
  • DRUG-ADMINISTRATION PERSPECTIVE
  • MULTIPLE INFORMANT AGREEMENT
  • REVISED CHILD ANXIETY
  • CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • INTERVIEW SCHEDULE
  • RATING-SCALE
  • DSM-IV
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES

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