Meeting the needs of older people living at home with dementia who have problems with continence

Vari M. Drennan, Jill Manthorpe*, Steve Ilifffe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the question of how to meet the needs of older people living at home with dementia who have problems with continence. The paper is focused on social care practice in community settings. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is practice focused and draws on the authors' research and experiences in clinical care, workforce development and service improvement. Findings - This paper summarises research on incontinence and its negative effects on quality of life and care relationships. It describes the impact of incontinence in terms of social embarrassment, restricted social activity, extra work (such as laundry) and costs, but also distress. It links research with care practice, with a focus on people with dementia who may be at particular risk of both continence problems and of assumptions that nothing can be done to assist them. Social implications - This paper provides questions that could be addressed in commissioning and provision of services and argues that they need to be informed by care practitioners' experiences. It provides details of sources of support that are available at national and local levels. Originality/value - This paper draws together research on continence and social care practice to provide a series of self-assessment questions for local services. It focuses on social care workers who are at the frontline of practice including personal assistants and carers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-253
Number of pages8
JournalQUALITY IN AGEING
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Care work
  • Community dwelling
  • Continence
  • Dementia
  • Home care
  • Social care

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