Mental health-related stigma in health care and mental health-care settings

Claire Henderson*, Jo Noblett, Hannah Parke, Sarah Clement, Alison Caffrey, Oliver Gale-Grant, Beate Schulze, Benjamin Druss, Graham Thornicroft

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

421 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This Review considers the evidence for mental-health-related stigma in health-care and mental-health-care settings. Do mental-health-care and other health-care professionals stigmatise people using their services? If so, what are the effects on quality of mental and physical health care? How can stigma and discrimination in the context of health care be reduced? We show that the contact mental-health-care professionals have with people with mental illness is associated with positive attitudes about civil rights, but does not reduce stigma as does social contact such as with friends or family members with mental illness. Some evidence suggests educational interventions are effective in decreasing stigma especially for general health-care professionals with little or no formal mental health training. Intervention studies are needed to underpin policy; for instance, to decrease disparity in mortality associated with poor access to physical health care for people with mental illness compared with people without mental illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-482
Number of pages16
JournalThe Lancet Psychiatry
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014

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