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Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial

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Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation : Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial. / Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, Anne Fleur; Luman, Marjolein; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Bet, Pierre; Oosterlaan, Jaap.

In: Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 24, No. 13, 01.11.2020, p. 1824-1835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, AF, Luman, M, Sonuga-Barke, E, Bet, P & Oosterlaan, J 2020, 'Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial', Journal of Attention Disorders, vol. 24, no. 13, pp. 1824-1835. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054717713640

APA

Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, A. F., Luman, M., Sonuga-Barke, E., Bet, P., & Oosterlaan, J. (2020). Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Attention Disorders, 24(13), 1824-1835. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054717713640

Vancouver

Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam AF, Luman M, Sonuga-Barke E, Bet P, Oosterlaan J. Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Attention Disorders. 2020 Nov 1;24(13):1824-1835. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054717713640

Author

Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, Anne Fleur ; Luman, Marjolein ; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund ; Bet, Pierre ; Oosterlaan, Jaap. / Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation : Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Journal of Attention Disorders. 2020 ; Vol. 24, No. 13. pp. 1824-1835.

Bibtex Download

@article{47ccfc735c37467bb8db87a012b9d0e6,
title = "Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation: Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial",
abstract = "Objective: This study investigated whether improvements in working memory, reaction time, lapses of attention, interference control, academic motivation, and perceived competence mediated effects of methylphenidate on math performance. Method: Sixty-three children (ADHD diagnosis; methylphenidate treatment; age 8-13; IQ > 70) were randomly allocated to a 7-day methylphenidate or placebo treatment in this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study and compared with 67 controls. Data were collected at schools and analyzed using mixed-model analysis. Methylphenidate was hypothesized to improve all measures; all measures were evaluated as potential mediators of methylphenidate-related math improvements. Results: Controls mostly outperformed the ADHD group. Methylphenidate did not affect measures of cognitive functioning (p =.082-.641) or academic motivation (p =.199-.865). Methylphenidate improved parent ratings of their child{\textquoteright}s self-perceived competence (p <.01), which mediated methylphenidate efficacy on math productivity. Conclusion: These results question the necessity of improvements in specific cognitive and motivational deficits associated with ADHD for medication-related academic improvement. They also stimulate further study of perceived competence as a mediator.",
keywords = "academic performance, ADD/ADHD, cognition, competence, methylphenidate",
author = "Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, {Anne Fleur} and Marjolein Luman and Edmund Sonuga-Barke and Pierre Bet and Jaap Oosterlaan",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1087054717713640",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "1824--1835",
journal = "Journal of Attention Disorders",
issn = "1087-0547",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "13",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methylphenidate-Related Improvements in Math Performance Cannot Be Explained by Better Cognitive Functioning or Higher Academic Motivation

T2 - Evidence From a Randomized Controlled Trial

AU - Kortekaas-Rijlaarsdam, Anne Fleur

AU - Luman, Marjolein

AU - Sonuga-Barke, Edmund

AU - Bet, Pierre

AU - Oosterlaan, Jaap

PY - 2020/11/1

Y1 - 2020/11/1

N2 - Objective: This study investigated whether improvements in working memory, reaction time, lapses of attention, interference control, academic motivation, and perceived competence mediated effects of methylphenidate on math performance. Method: Sixty-three children (ADHD diagnosis; methylphenidate treatment; age 8-13; IQ > 70) were randomly allocated to a 7-day methylphenidate or placebo treatment in this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study and compared with 67 controls. Data were collected at schools and analyzed using mixed-model analysis. Methylphenidate was hypothesized to improve all measures; all measures were evaluated as potential mediators of methylphenidate-related math improvements. Results: Controls mostly outperformed the ADHD group. Methylphenidate did not affect measures of cognitive functioning (p =.082-.641) or academic motivation (p =.199-.865). Methylphenidate improved parent ratings of their child’s self-perceived competence (p <.01), which mediated methylphenidate efficacy on math productivity. Conclusion: These results question the necessity of improvements in specific cognitive and motivational deficits associated with ADHD for medication-related academic improvement. They also stimulate further study of perceived competence as a mediator.

AB - Objective: This study investigated whether improvements in working memory, reaction time, lapses of attention, interference control, academic motivation, and perceived competence mediated effects of methylphenidate on math performance. Method: Sixty-three children (ADHD diagnosis; methylphenidate treatment; age 8-13; IQ > 70) were randomly allocated to a 7-day methylphenidate or placebo treatment in this double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study and compared with 67 controls. Data were collected at schools and analyzed using mixed-model analysis. Methylphenidate was hypothesized to improve all measures; all measures were evaluated as potential mediators of methylphenidate-related math improvements. Results: Controls mostly outperformed the ADHD group. Methylphenidate did not affect measures of cognitive functioning (p =.082-.641) or academic motivation (p =.199-.865). Methylphenidate improved parent ratings of their child’s self-perceived competence (p <.01), which mediated methylphenidate efficacy on math productivity. Conclusion: These results question the necessity of improvements in specific cognitive and motivational deficits associated with ADHD for medication-related academic improvement. They also stimulate further study of perceived competence as a mediator.

KW - academic performance

KW - ADD/ADHD

KW - cognition

KW - competence

KW - methylphenidate

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058299868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1087054717713640

DO - 10.1177/1087054717713640

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85058299868

VL - 24

SP - 1824

EP - 1835

JO - Journal of Attention Disorders

JF - Journal of Attention Disorders

SN - 1087-0547

IS - 13

ER -

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