'Modern conditions demand integration and professionalism': The transition from Joint Intelligence Bureau to Defence Intelligence Staff and the long march to centralisation in British military intelligence

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Abstract

This article explores the reforms that occurred in British military and military-related intelligence in 1946 and in 1964.It charts the development of the Joint Intelligence Bureau, which was created at the end of the war as a central organisation to provide intelligence on several military related issues, and how it was eventually merged with the service intelligence agencies in 1964 to form the Defence Intelligence Staff. It argues that the reforms of 1946, although functional, were flawed, as they satisfied neither the advocates of wholesale centralisation nor the champions of individual service responsibility. The inevitable outcome was a series of divisive arguments over responsibility and ‘turf’, which could only be resolved when the issue of defence centralisation was firmly grasped by senior politicians.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-177
Number of pages17
JournalPUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online date21 Nov 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • British intelligence
  • Defence Intelligence
  • Kenneth Strong

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