Modulation of the Gut Microbiota to Control Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)—A Narrative Review with a Focus on Faecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT)

Blair Merrick, Chrysi Sergaki, Lindsey Edwards, David L. Moyes, Michael Kertanegara, Désirée Prossomariti, Debbie L. Shawcross, Simon D. Goldenberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, causing a substantial burden to the global healthcare system. AMR in Gram-negative organisms is particularly concerning due to a dramatic rise in infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (ESBL and CPE). These pathogens have limited treatment options and are associated with poor clinical outcomes, including high mortality rates. The microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract acts as a major reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (the resistome), and the environment facilitates intra and inter-species transfer of mobile genetic elements carrying these resistance genes. As colonisation often precedes infection, strategies to manipulate the resistome to limit endogenous infections with AMR organisms, as well as prevent transmission to others, is a worthwhile pursuit. This narrative review presents existing evidence on how manipulation of the gut microbiota can be exploited to therapeutically restore colonisation resistance using a number of methods, including diet, probiotics, bacteriophages and faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-254
Number of pages17
JournalInfectious Disease Reports
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2023

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • antimicrobial stewardship
  • bacteriophage
  • dysbiosis
  • faecal microbiota transplantation
  • gut microbiota
  • microbiome
  • probiotics
  • resistome

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