King's College London

Research portal

Multiple comparison of different noninvasive brain stimulation and pharmacologic interventions in patients with methamphetamine use disorders: a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Ming-Kung Wu, Kazumi Satogami, Chih-Sung Liang, Brendon Stubbs, Andre F Carvalho, Andre R Brunoni, Kuan-Pin Su, Yu-Kang Tu, Yi-Cheng Wu, Tien-Yu Chen, Dian-Jeng Li, Pao-Yen Lin, Chih-Wei Hsu, Yen-Wen Chen, Mein-Woei Suen, Bing-Yan Zeng, Shun Takahashi, Ping-Tao Tseng, Cheng-Ta Li

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)633-643
Number of pages11
JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume76
Issue number12
Early online date25 Jul 2022
DOIs
Accepted/In press2022
E-pub ahead of print25 Jul 2022
PublishedDec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The current work did not receive any financial support. The authors of this work were supported by the following grants: Brendon Stubbs is supported by a Clinical Lectureship (ICA‐CL‐2017‐03‐001) jointly funded by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Brendon Stubbs is part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Brendon Stubbs is also supported by the Maudsley Charity, King's College London and the NIHR South London Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) funding. The work of Kuan‐Pin Su is supported by the following grants: ANHRF109‐31 from An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan; CMU108‐SR‐106 from China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; and CMU104‐S‐16‐01, CMU103‐BC‐4‐1, CRS‐108‐048, DMR‐108‐216, DMR‐109‐102, DMR‐109‐244, DMR‐HHC‐109‐11 and DMR‐HCC‐109‐12 from China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. The work by Pao‐Yen Lin is supported by the following grants: MOST 106‐2314‐B‐182A‐085‐MY2 and MOST 105‐2314‐B‐182A‐057 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan The work by Pao‐Yen Lin is supported by the following grants: MOST 106‐2314‐B‐182A‐085‐MY2 and MOST 105‐2314‐B‐182A‐057 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan; and CMRPG8F1371, CMRPG8E1061F from Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. The work of Yu‐Kang Tu was supported by a grant from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (grant no: 106‐2314‐B‐002‐098‐MY3). Andre R. Brunoni receives grants from Sao Paulo Research State Foundation (FAPESP, 2018/10861‐7, 2019/06009‐6), Brazilian National Council of Scientific Development productivity support (PQ‐1B), and University of Sao Paulo Medical School productivity support (PIPA‐A), and Newton Advanced Fellowship (NAFR 2012\1010), and in‐kind support from Flow Neuroscience and MagVenture. The Laboratory of Neuroscience receives financial support from the Beneficent Association Alzira Denise Hertzog da Silva and the CAPES/INCT program “National Institute of Biomarkers in Psychiatry” (INBioN). This manuscript was edited by Wallace Academic Editing. The work by Chih‐Wei Hsu is supported by the following grants: MOST 109‐2314‐B‐182A‐009‐MY2 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. This paper presents independent research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the acknowledged institutions. Funding Information: The current work did not receive any financial support. The authors of this work were supported by the following grants: Brendon Stubbs is supported by a Clinical Lectureship (ICA-CL-2017-03-001) jointly funded by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Brendon Stubbs is part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Brendon Stubbs is also supported by the Maudsley Charity, King's College London and the NIHR South London Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) funding. The work of Kuan-Pin Su is supported by the following grants: ANHRF109-31 from An Nan Hospital, China Medical University, Tainan, Taiwan; CMU108-SR-106 from China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; and CMU104-S-16-01, CMU103-BC-4-1, CRS-108-048, DMR-108-216, DMR-109-102, DMR-109-244, DMR-HHC-109-11 and DMR-HCC-109-12 from China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. The work by Pao-Yen Lin is supported by the following grants: MOST 106-2314-B-182A-085-MY2 and MOST 105-2314-B-182A-057 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan The work by Pao-Yen Lin is supported by the following grants: MOST 106-2314-B-182A-085-MY2 and MOST 105-2314-B-182A-057 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan; and CMRPG8F1371, CMRPG8E1061F from Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. The work of Yu-Kang Tu was supported by a grant from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan (grant no: 106-2314-B-002-098-MY3). Andre R. Brunoni receives grants from Sao Paulo Research State Foundation (FAPESP, 2018/10861-7, 2019/06009-6), Brazilian National Council of Scientific Development productivity support (PQ-1B), and University of Sao Paulo Medical School productivity support (PIPA-A), and Newton Advanced Fellowship (NAFR 2012\1010), and in-kind support from Flow Neuroscience and MagVenture. The Laboratory of Neuroscience receives financial support from the Beneficent Association Alzira Denise Hertzog da Silva and the CAPES/INCT program “National Institute of Biomarkers in Psychiatry” (INBioN). This manuscript was edited by Wallace Academic Editing. The work by Chih-Wei Hsu is supported by the following grants: MOST 109-2314-B-182A-009-MY2 from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. This paper presents independent research. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the acknowledged institutions. Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2022 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

King's Authors

Abstract

Aim: In recent decades, the prevalence of amphetamine and methamphetamine use disorders has at least doubled in some regions/countries, with accompanying high risks of drug overdose-associated mortality. Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) methods may be effective treatments. However, the comparative efficacy of the NIBS protocol for amphetamine/methamphetamine use disorder (AUD/MUD) remains unknown to date. The aim of this network meta-analysis (NMA) was to compare the efficacy and acceptability of various NIBS methods/protocols for AUD/MUD management. Methods: A frequentist model-based NMA was conducted. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the efficacy of NIBS and guideline-recommended pharmacologic treatments to reduce craving severity in patients with either AUD or MUD. Results: Twenty-two RCTs including 1888 participants met the eligibility criteria. Compared with the sham/placebo group (study = 19, subjects = 891), a combination of intermittent theta burst stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and continuous TBS over the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex (study = 1, subjects = 19) was associated with the largest decreases in craving severity [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −1.50; 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) = −2.70 to −0.31]. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left DLPFC was associated with the largest improvements in depression and quality of sleep (study = 3, subjects = 86) (SMD = −2.48; 95%CIs = −3.25 to −1.71 and SMD = −2.43; 95%CIs = −3.38 to −1.48, respectively). The drop-out rate of most investigated treatments did not significantly differ between groups. Conclusion: The combined TBS protocol over the prefrontal cortex was associated with the greatest improvement in craving severity. Since few studies were available for inclusion, additional large-scale randomized controlled trials are warranted.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454