NATURAL HISTORY OF DEPRESSION UP TO 24 YEARS AFTER STROKE: THE SOUTH LONDON STROKE REGISTER

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstractpeer-review

Abstract

Background and aims: Limited data are available on the long-term natural history of post-stroke depression. We aim to determine the prevalence, incidence, cumulative incidence, duration, persistent and recurrent rates of depression up to 24 years after stroke.


Methods: Data were from first-ever stroke patients registered in the South London Stroke Register. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale was used to assess patients for depression symptoms. Depression was defined as a cut-off score >7. Inverse probability weighting was used to deal with missing data.


Results: The prevalence of depression was stable at approximately 30% at any time up to 15 years after stroke, with a slight increase to 40% from 15-year onwards. Cumulative incidence of depression was 60%. Over 50% of patients had their first episodes within 1 year after stroke and about 90% within 5 years after stroke. 47% of the patients with depression at 3 months had recovered at 1 year. New onset and persistent depression were less common in later years, with recurrent cases comprising the largest proportion of depressed patients from 5-year onwards. Prevalence was higher in patients with severe physical disability, severe stroke, pre-stroke depression or cognitive impairment (40% vs 30%).


Conclusions: PSD featured had early onset, short duration and high recurrence, with recurrent depression comprising the greatest proportion of patients after 5 years. The prevalence of PSD was 10% higher in patients with defined risk factors. More medical resource should be allocated to those who ever depressed in monitoring recurrence in the long term.
Original languageEnglish
Article number928
Pages (from-to)341-341
JournalEuropean Stroke Journal
Volume8
Issue number2_suppl
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 May 2023

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