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Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict: The INFOCORE Approach

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Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict : The INFOCORE Approach. / Meyer, Christoph; Frère, Marie-Soleil; Baden, Christian.

In: Media, War & Conflict, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.03.2018, p. 3-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Meyer, C, Frère, M-S & Baden, C 2018, 'Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict: The INFOCORE Approach', Media, War & Conflict, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 3-21. https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635217719754

APA

Meyer, C., Frère, M-S., & Baden, C. (2018). Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict: The INFOCORE Approach. Media, War & Conflict, 11(1), 3-21. https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635217719754

Vancouver

Meyer C, Frère M-S, Baden C. Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict: The INFOCORE Approach. Media, War & Conflict. 2018 Mar 1;11(1):3-21. https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635217719754

Author

Meyer, Christoph ; Frère, Marie-Soleil ; Baden, Christian. / Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict : The INFOCORE Approach. In: Media, War & Conflict. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 3-21.

Bibtex Download

@article{887bd32631db4ff19d74a38eb6c061ee,
title = "Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict: The INFOCORE Approach",
abstract = "The article draws on the first findings of the INFOCORE project to betterunderstand the ways in which different types of media matter to theemergence, escalation or conversely, the pacification and prevention ofviolence. It makes the case for combining an interactionalist approach ofmedia influence, which is centred on the effects of evidential claims,frames and agendas made by various actors over time, with greatersensitivity for the factors that make conflict cases so different. We arguedthat the specific role played by the media depends, chiefly, a) on the waysin which it transforms conflict actors{\textquoteright} claims, interpretations andprescriptions into media content and b) their ability to amplify thesecontents and endow them with reach, visibility and consonance. We foundsignificant variation in media roles across six conflict cases and suggestthat they are best explained by: four interlocking conditioning factors: (i)the the degree to which the media landscape is diverse and free, orconversely, controlled and instrumentalised by conflict parties; (ii) societalattitudes to and uses of different media by audiences; (iii) differentdegrees of conflict intensity and dynamics between the conflict parties; (iv)the degree and nature of the involvement of regional and internationalactors. We argue that de-escalatory media influence will be most effectiveover the longer term, in settings of low intensity conflict and when tailoredcarefully to local conditions. ",
keywords = "media, conflict, evidential claims, frames, peace, agendas for action",
author = "Christoph Meyer and Marie-Soleil Fr{\`e}re and Christian Baden",
year = "2018",
month = mar,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1750635217719754",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "3--21",
journal = "Media, War & Conflict",
issn = "1750-6352",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Navigating the Complexities of Media Roles in Conflict

T2 - The INFOCORE Approach

AU - Meyer, Christoph

AU - Frère, Marie-Soleil

AU - Baden, Christian

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - The article draws on the first findings of the INFOCORE project to betterunderstand the ways in which different types of media matter to theemergence, escalation or conversely, the pacification and prevention ofviolence. It makes the case for combining an interactionalist approach ofmedia influence, which is centred on the effects of evidential claims,frames and agendas made by various actors over time, with greatersensitivity for the factors that make conflict cases so different. We arguedthat the specific role played by the media depends, chiefly, a) on the waysin which it transforms conflict actors’ claims, interpretations andprescriptions into media content and b) their ability to amplify thesecontents and endow them with reach, visibility and consonance. We foundsignificant variation in media roles across six conflict cases and suggestthat they are best explained by: four interlocking conditioning factors: (i)the the degree to which the media landscape is diverse and free, orconversely, controlled and instrumentalised by conflict parties; (ii) societalattitudes to and uses of different media by audiences; (iii) differentdegrees of conflict intensity and dynamics between the conflict parties; (iv)the degree and nature of the involvement of regional and internationalactors. We argue that de-escalatory media influence will be most effectiveover the longer term, in settings of low intensity conflict and when tailoredcarefully to local conditions.

AB - The article draws on the first findings of the INFOCORE project to betterunderstand the ways in which different types of media matter to theemergence, escalation or conversely, the pacification and prevention ofviolence. It makes the case for combining an interactionalist approach ofmedia influence, which is centred on the effects of evidential claims,frames and agendas made by various actors over time, with greatersensitivity for the factors that make conflict cases so different. We arguedthat the specific role played by the media depends, chiefly, a) on the waysin which it transforms conflict actors’ claims, interpretations andprescriptions into media content and b) their ability to amplify thesecontents and endow them with reach, visibility and consonance. We foundsignificant variation in media roles across six conflict cases and suggestthat they are best explained by: four interlocking conditioning factors: (i)the the degree to which the media landscape is diverse and free, orconversely, controlled and instrumentalised by conflict parties; (ii) societalattitudes to and uses of different media by audiences; (iii) differentdegrees of conflict intensity and dynamics between the conflict parties; (iv)the degree and nature of the involvement of regional and internationalactors. We argue that de-escalatory media influence will be most effectiveover the longer term, in settings of low intensity conflict and when tailoredcarefully to local conditions.

KW - media

KW - conflict

KW - evidential claims

KW - frames

KW - peace

KW - agendas for action

U2 - 10.1177/1750635217719754

DO - 10.1177/1750635217719754

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 3

EP - 21

JO - Media, War & Conflict

JF - Media, War & Conflict

SN - 1750-6352

IS - 1

ER -

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