Negative Self-Beliefs in Eating Disorders: A Cognitive-Bias-Modification Study

Jenny Yiend, Charlotte Parnes, Kirsty Shepherd, Mary-Kate Roche, Myra Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In eating disorders (EDs), interest commonly focuses on eating, weight, and shape rather than on beliefs. In this study, we investigated the importance of negative self-beliefs in EDs by examining whether manipulating those beliefs would elicit symptom-relevant change. The technique cognitive-bias modification is ideal for this purpose because it permits experimental manipulation of beliefs. Using content derived from the clinical literature, we applied cognitive-bias modification to a sample of 88 subclinical participants. Results demonstrated a wide range of effects, including significant change in target beliefs, ED behaviors, related intrusive thoughts, anxiety, and depression, some of which were maintained at 1-week follow-up. Although one measure of ED symptoms remained unaltered, our data nevertheless evidence a causal role of negative self-beliefs in ED pathology and suggest that future work in clinical samples is warranted, including identification of factors determining susceptibility to the technique.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)756-766
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Psychological Science
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Keywords

  • cognition and emotion, emotional-processing biases, psychopathology, eating disorders, negative self-beliefs cognitive-bias modification

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Negative Self-Beliefs in Eating Disorders: A Cognitive-Bias-Modification Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this