Neural correlates of emotional processing in psychosis risk and onset – a systematic review and meta-analysis of fMRI studies

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)
99 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

emotion processing is a well-established component of psychotic disorders and is already present at the first episode of psychosis (FEP). However, the role of emotion processing abnormalities in the emergence of psychosis and the underlying neurobiology remains unclear. Here, we systematically reviewed functional magnetic resonance studies that used emotion processing task paradigms in FEP patients, and in people at clinical high-risk for psychosis (CHRp). Image-based meta-analyses with Seed-based d Mapping on available studies (n=6) were also performed. Compared to controls, FEP patients showed decreased neural responses to emotion, particularly in the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. There were no significant differences between CHR subjects and controls, but a high degree of heterogeneity was identified across studies. The role of altered emotion processing in the early phase of psychosis may be clarified through more homogenous experimental designs, particularly in the CHR population.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Psychosis
  • Clinical high-risk
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Seed-based d mapping

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Neural correlates of emotional processing in psychosis risk and onset – a systematic review and meta-analysis of fMRI studies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this