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Neuroimaging evidence for structural correlates in adolescents resilient to polysubstance use: A five-year follow-up study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

for the IMAGEN Consortium

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-22
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume49
DOIs
PublishedAug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This work was supported by grants from the European Union–funded Sixth Framework Programme Integrated Project IMAGEN (Reinforcement-Related Behaviour in Normal Brain Function and Psychopathology) (LSHM-CT-2007-037286), the Medical Research Council Grant ‘‘Developmental pathways into adolescent substance abuse’’ (93558) and Consortium on Vulnerability to Externalizing Disorders and Addictions [c-VEDA] (MR/N000390/1), the National Institute for Health Research, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF grants 01GS08152, 01EV0711, eMED SysAlc01ZX1311A, Forschungsnetz AERIAL), and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG grants SM 80/7-1, SM 80/7-2, SFB 940/1), the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-12-SAMA-0004, AAPG2019 – GeBra), the Eranet Neuron (AF12-NEUR0008-01 – WM2NA; and ANR-18-NEUR00002-01 – ADORe), the Fondation de France (00081242), the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale (DPA20140629802), the Mission Interministérielle de Lutte-contre-les-Drogues-et-les-Conduites-Addictives (2016-MILDECA-UP13-01), the Assistance-Publique-Hôpitaux-de-Paris and INSERM (interface grant), Paris Sud University IDEX 2012, the Fondation de l'Avenir (grant AP-RM-17-013), the Fédération pour la Recherche sur le Cerveau (grant C16/0932A01). All the funding sources had no further role in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit paper for publication. The authors thank the Strasbourg University for study promotion in France, Aveline Aouidad and Sarah Stillman for their advices. Funding Information: Dr Banascheski has served as an advisor or consultant to Bristol-Myers Squibb, Desitin Arzneimittel, Eli Lilly, Medice, Novartis, Pfizer, Shire, UCB, and Vifor Pharma; he has received conference attendance support, conference support, or speaking fees from Eli Lilly, Janssen McNeil, Medice, Novartis, Shire, and UCB. Dr Gowland has received a research grant from Lyndra and an honorarium paid to her employer from GlaxoSmithKline. Dr Poustka has received conference attendance support or speaking fees from Medice, Novartis, and Shire. Dr Walter has received a speaking honorarium from Servier. The present work is unrelated to these relationships. The other authors have no potential conflict of interest or biomedical financial disclosure to make. Funding Information: This work was supported by grants from the European Union – funded Sixth Framework Programme Integrated Project IMAGEN (Reinforcement-Related Behaviour in Normal Brain Function and Psychopathology) (LSHM-CT-2007-037286), the Medical Research Council Grant ‘‘Developmental pathways into adolescent substance abuse’’ ( 93558 ) and Consortium on Vulnerability to Externalizing Disorders and Addictions [c-VEDA] ( MR/N000390/1 ), the National Institute for Health Research, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF grants 01GS08152 , 01EV0711 , eMED SysAlc01ZX1311A, Forschungsnetz AERIAL), and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG grants SM 80/7-1 , SM 80/7-2 , SFB 940/1 ), the Agence Nationale de la Recherche ( ANR-12-SAMA-0004 , AAPG2019 – GeBra), the Eranet Neuron ( AF12-NEUR0008-01 – WM2NA ; and ANR-18-NEUR00002-01 – ADORe ), the Fondation de France ( 00081242 ), the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale ( DPA20140629802 ), the Mission Interministérielle de Lutte-contre-les-Drogues-et-les-Conduites-Addictives ( 2016-MILDECA-UP13-01 ), the Assistance-Publique-Hôpitaux-de-Paris and INSERM (interface grant), Paris Sud University IDEX 2012, the Fondation de l'Avenir (grant AP-RM-17-013 ), the Fédération pour la Recherche sur le Cerveau (grant C16/0932A01 ). All the funding sources had no further role in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit paper for publication. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Early initiation of polysubstance use (PSU) is a strong predictor of subsequent addiction, however scarce individuals present resilience capacity. This neuroimaging study aimed to investigate structural correlates associated with cessation or reduction of PSU and determine the extent to which brain structural features accounted for this resilient outcome. Participants from a European community-based cohort self-reported their alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use frequency at ages 14, 16 and 19 and had neuroimaging sessions at ages 14 and 19. We included three groups in the study: the resilient-to-PSU participants showed PSU at 16 and/or 14 but no more at 19 (n = 18), the enduring polysubstance users at 19 displayed PSU continuation from 14 or 16 (n = 193) and the controls were abstinent or low drinking participants (n = 460). We conducted between-group comparisons of grey matter volumes on whole brain using voxel-based morphometry and regional fractional anisotropy using tract-based spatial statistics. Random-forests machine-learning approach generated individual-level PSU-behavior predictions based on personality and neuroimaging features. Adolescents resilient to PSU showed significant larger grey matter volumes in the bilateral cingulate gyrus compared with enduring polysubstance users and controls at ages 19 and 14 (p<0.05 corrected) but no difference in fractional anisotropy. The larger cingulate volumes and personality trait “openness to experience” were the best precursors of resilience to PSU. Early in adolescence, a larger cingulate gyrus differentiated adolescents resilient to PSU, and this feature was critical in predicting this outcome. This study encourages further research into the neurobiological bases of resilience to addictive behaviors.

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