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Novel GFM2 variants associated with early-onset neurological presentations of mitochondrial disease and impaired expression of OXPHOS subunits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Ruth I.C. Glasgow, Kyle Thompson, Inês A. Barbosa, Langping He, Charlotte L. Alston, Charu Deshpande, Michael A. Simpson, Andrew A.M. Morris, Axel Neu, Ulrike Löbel, Julie Hall, Holger Prokisch, Tobias B. Haack, Maja Hempel, Robert McFarland, Robert W. Taylor

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalNEUROGENETICS
Early online date26 Oct 2017
DOIs
Accepted/In press3 Oct 2017
E-pub ahead of print26 Oct 2017

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Abstract

Mitochondrial diseases are characterised by clinical, molecular and functional heterogeneity, reflecting their bi-genomic control. The nuclear gene GFM2 encodes mtEFG2, a protein with an essential role during the termination stage of mitochondrial translation. We present here two unrelated patients harbouring different and previously unreported compound heterozygous (c.569G>A, p.(Arg190Gln); c.636delA, p.(Glu213Argfs*3)) and homozygous (c.275A>C, p.(Tyr92Ser)) recessive variants in GFM2 identified by whole exome sequencing (WES) together with histochemical and biochemical findings to support the diagnoses of pathological GFM2 variants in each case. Both patients presented similarly in early childhood with global developmental delay, raised CSF lactate and abnormalities on cranial MRI. Sanger sequencing of familial samples confirmed the segregation of bi-allelic GFM2 variants with disease, while investigations into steady-state mitochondrial protein levels revealed respiratory chain subunit defects and loss of mtEFG2 protein in muscle. These data demonstrate the effects of defective mtEFG2 function, caused by previously unreported variants, confirming pathogenicity and expanding the clinical phenotypes associated with GFM2 variants.

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