King's College London

Research portal

“Now I Am Myself”: Exploring How People With Poststroke Aphasia Experienced Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Within the SOFIA Trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Sarah Northcott, Alan Simpson, Shirley Thomas, Rachel Barnard, Kidge Burns, Shashivadan P. Hirani, Katerina Hilari

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2041-2055
Number of pages15
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
Accepted/In press2021
PublishedSep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work was supported by the Stroke Association Jack and Averil (Mansfield) Bradley Fellowship Award for Stroke Research [grant number TSA PDF 2016/01]. Funding Information: The authors are grateful to all the participants and their families, National Health Service (NHS) sites, research assistants, and therapists. The authors acknowledge the Aphasia Advisory Group and the Trial Steering Committee for all their support throughout the trial. The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work was supported by the Stroke Association Jack and Averil (Mansfield) Bradley Fellowship Award for Stroke Research [grant number TSA PDF 2016/01]. Publisher Copyright: © The Author(s) 2021.

King's Authors

Abstract

Aphasia, a language disability, can profoundly affect a person’s mood and identity. The experiences of participants who received Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, a psychological intervention, were explored in the Solution-Focused brief therapy In poststroke Aphasia (SOFIA) Trial. Thirty participants with chronic aphasia, 14 with severe aphasia, participated in in-depth interviews that were analyzed using framework analysis. Two overarching themes emerged: valued therapy components (exploring hopes, noticing achievements, companionship, sharing feelings, and relationship with therapist) and perceptions of progress (mood, identity, communication, relationships, and independence). Participants were categorized into four groups: (a) “changed,” where therapy had a meaningful impact on a person’s life; (b) “connected,” where therapy was valued primarily for companionship; (c) “complemental,” where therapy complemented a participant’s upward trajectory; and (d) “discordant,” where therapy misaligned with participants’ preference for impairment-based language work. This study suggests that it is feasible to adapt a psychological therapy for people with aphasia, who perceive it as valuable.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454