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Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care: The politics of drift and dilution

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Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care : The politics of drift and dilution. / Rafferty, Anne M.

In: Health Economics, Policy and Law, Vol. 13, No. 3-4, 01.07.2018, p. 475-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Rafferty, AM 2018, 'Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care: The politics of drift and dilution', Health Economics, Policy and Law, vol. 13, no. 3-4, pp. 475-491. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744133117000482

APA

Rafferty, A. M. (2018). Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care: The politics of drift and dilution. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 13(3-4), 475-491. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744133117000482

Vancouver

Rafferty AM. Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care: The politics of drift and dilution. Health Economics, Policy and Law. 2018 Jul 1;13(3-4):475-491. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1744133117000482

Author

Rafferty, Anne M. / Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care : The politics of drift and dilution. In: Health Economics, Policy and Law. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 3-4. pp. 475-491.

Bibtex Download

@article{cc37cb4f521841faab1030cc0d62e5a4,
title = "Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care: The politics of drift and dilution",
abstract = "This paper takes the 70th Anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom as an opportunity to reflect upon the strategic direction of nursing policy and the extent to which nurses can realise their potential as change agents in building a better future for health care. It argues that the policy trajectory set for nursing at the outset of the NHS continues to influence its strategic direction, and that the trajectory needs to be reset with the voices of nurses being more engaged in the design, as much as the delivery of health policy. There is a growing evidence base about the benefits for patients and nurses of deploying well-educated nurses at the top of their skill set, to provide needed care for patients in adequately staffed and resourced units, as well as the value that nurses contribute to decision-making in clinical care. Yet much of this evidence is not being implemented. On the contrary, some of it is being ignored. Policy remains fragmented, driven by short-term financial constraints and underinvestment in high quality care. Nurses need to make their voices heard, and use the evidence base to change the dialogue with the public, policy makers and politicians, in order to build a better future for health care.",
author = "Rafferty, {Anne M.}",
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RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nurses as change agents for a better future in health care

T2 - The politics of drift and dilution

AU - Rafferty, Anne M.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - This paper takes the 70th Anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom as an opportunity to reflect upon the strategic direction of nursing policy and the extent to which nurses can realise their potential as change agents in building a better future for health care. It argues that the policy trajectory set for nursing at the outset of the NHS continues to influence its strategic direction, and that the trajectory needs to be reset with the voices of nurses being more engaged in the design, as much as the delivery of health policy. There is a growing evidence base about the benefits for patients and nurses of deploying well-educated nurses at the top of their skill set, to provide needed care for patients in adequately staffed and resourced units, as well as the value that nurses contribute to decision-making in clinical care. Yet much of this evidence is not being implemented. On the contrary, some of it is being ignored. Policy remains fragmented, driven by short-term financial constraints and underinvestment in high quality care. Nurses need to make their voices heard, and use the evidence base to change the dialogue with the public, policy makers and politicians, in order to build a better future for health care.

AB - This paper takes the 70th Anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom as an opportunity to reflect upon the strategic direction of nursing policy and the extent to which nurses can realise their potential as change agents in building a better future for health care. It argues that the policy trajectory set for nursing at the outset of the NHS continues to influence its strategic direction, and that the trajectory needs to be reset with the voices of nurses being more engaged in the design, as much as the delivery of health policy. There is a growing evidence base about the benefits for patients and nurses of deploying well-educated nurses at the top of their skill set, to provide needed care for patients in adequately staffed and resourced units, as well as the value that nurses contribute to decision-making in clinical care. Yet much of this evidence is not being implemented. On the contrary, some of it is being ignored. Policy remains fragmented, driven by short-term financial constraints and underinvestment in high quality care. Nurses need to make their voices heard, and use the evidence base to change the dialogue with the public, policy makers and politicians, in order to build a better future for health care.

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U2 - 10.1017/S1744133117000482

DO - 10.1017/S1744133117000482

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85048856322

VL - 13

SP - 475

EP - 491

JO - Health economics, policy, and law

JF - Health economics, policy, and law

SN - 1744-1331

IS - 3-4

ER -

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