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One size does not fit all. Genomics differentiates among anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Christopher Hübel, Mohamed Abdulkadir, Moritz Herle, Ruth J F Loos, Gerome Breen, Cynthia M Bulik, Nadia Micali

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)785-793
Number of pages9
JournalThe International journal of eating disorders
Volume54
Issue number5
Early online date28 Feb 2021
DOIs
E-pub ahead of print28 Feb 2021
PublishedMay 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: We are deeply grateful to all the families who took part in this study, the midwives for their help in recruiting them, and the whole ALSPAC team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. This study was completed as part of approved UK Biobank study applications 27546 to Prof. Breen. This study represents independent research part funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the UK NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. High performance computing facilities were funded with capital equipment grants from the GSTT Charity (TR130505) and Maudsley Charity (980). This work was supported by the UK Medical Research Council and the Medical Research Foundation (ref: MR/R004803/1). The UK Medical Research Council and Wellcome (Grant ref: 102215/2/13/2 and 217065/Z/19/Z) and the University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC. A comprehensive list of grants funding is available on the ALSPAC website ( http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/external/documents/grant‐acknowledgements.pdf ); This research was specifically funded by the NIHR (CS/01/2008/014), the NIH (MH087786‐01). GWAS data were generated by Sample Logistics and Genotyping Facilities at Wellcome Sanger Institute and LabCorp (Laboratory Corporation of America) using support from 23andMe. N. M. and C. M. B. acknowledge funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (R21 MH115397). C. M. B. acknowledges funding from the Swedish Research Council (VR Dnr: 538‐2013‐8864), the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health (R21MH115397; R01 MH109528; R01MH120170; R01MH119084; R01MH120170), and Lundbeckfonden. C. H. acknowledges funding by Lundbeckfonden (R276‐2018‐4581). M. H. is supported by fellowship from the Medical Research Council UK (MR/T027843/1). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The funders were not involved in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. Funding Information: We are deeply grateful to all the families who took part in this study, the midwives for their help in recruiting them, and the whole ALSPAC team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. This study was completed as part of approved UK Biobank study applications 27546 to Prof. Breen. This study represents independent research part funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the UK NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. High performance computing facilities were funded with capital equipment grants from the GSTT Charity (TR130505) and Maudsley Charity (980). This work was supported by the UK Medical Research Council and the Medical Research Foundation (ref: MR/R004803/1). The UK Medical Research Council and Wellcome (Grant ref: 102215/2/13/2 and 217065/Z/19/Z) and the University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC. A comprehensive list of grants funding is available on the ALSPAC website (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/external/documents/grant-acknowledgements.pdf); This research was specifically funded by the NIHR (CS/01/2008/014), the NIH (MH087786-01). GWAS data were generated by Sample Logistics and Genotyping Facilities at Wellcome Sanger Institute and LabCorp (Laboratory Corporation of America) using support from 23andMe. N. M. and C. M. B. acknowledge funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (R21 MH115397). C. M. B. acknowledges funding from the Swedish Research Council (VR Dnr: 538-2013-8864), the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health (R21MH115397; R01 MH109528; R01MH120170; R01MH119084; R01MH120170), and Lundbeckfonden. C. H. acknowledges funding by Lundbeckfonden (R276-2018-4581). M. H. is supported by fellowship from the Medical Research Council UK (MR/T027843/1). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The funders were not involved in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. International Journal of Eating Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genomic regions associated with anorexia nervosa. No genome-wide studies of other eating disorders, such as bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder, have been performed, despite their substantial heritability. Exploratively, we aimed to identify traits that are genetically associated with binge-type eating disorders.

METHOD: We calculated genome-wide polygenic scores for 269 trait and disease outcomes using PRSice v2.2 and their association with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder in up to 640 cases and 17,050 controls from the UK Biobank. Significant associations were tested for replication in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (up to 217 cases and 3,018 controls).

RESULTS: Individuals with binge-type eating disorders had higher polygenic scores than controls for other psychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and higher polygenic scores for body mass index.

DISCUSSION: Our findings replicate some of the known comorbidities of eating disorders on a genomic level and motivate a deeper investigation of shared and unique genomic factors across the three primary eating disorders.

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