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One-day cognitive-behavioural therapy self-confidence workshops for people with depression: randomised controlled trial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222-233
Number of pages12
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume204
Issue number3
DOIs
Accepted/In press24 Jun 2013
PublishedMar 2014

Documents

  • HORRELL_Self_confidence_workshops_final_10Apr13

    HORRELL_Self_confidence_workshops_final_10Apr13.pdf, 119 KB, application/pdf

    Uploaded date:08 Jan 2016

    Version:Accepted author manuscript

  • Tables_10Apr13

    Tables_10Apr13.pdf, 123 KB, application/pdf

    Uploaded date:08 Jan 2016

    Version:Accepted author manuscript

  • Web_appx_10Apr13

    Web_appx_10Apr13.pdf, 91.9 KB, application/pdf

    Uploaded date:08 Jan 2016

    Version:Accepted author manuscript

King's Authors

Abstract

Background 
Despite its high prevalence, help-seeking for depression is low.

Aims 
To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 1-day cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) self-confidence workshops in reducing depression. Anxiety, self-esteem, prognostic indicators as well as access were also assessed.

Method 
An open randomised controlled trial (RCT) waiting list control design with 12-week follow-up was used (trial registration: ISRCTN26634837). A total of 459 adult participants with depression (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of >= 14) self-referred and 382 participants (83%) were followed up.

Results 
At follow-up, experimental and control participants differed significantly on the BDI, with an effect size of 0.55. Anxiety and self-esteem also differed. Of those who participated, 25% were GP non-consulters and 32% were from Black and minority ethnic groups. Women benefited more than men on depression scores. The intervention has a 90% chance of being considered cost-effective if a depression-free day is valued at 14.

Conclusions 
Self-confidence workshops appear promising in terms of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and access by difficult-to-engage groups.

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