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Oral surgery II: Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain

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Oral surgery II : Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain. / Renton, T.

In: British Dental Journal, Vol. 223, No. 11, 15.12.2017, p. 826-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Renton, T 2017, 'Oral surgery II: Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain', British Dental Journal, vol. 223, no. 11, pp. 826-836. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990

APA

Renton, T. (2017). Oral surgery II: Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain. British Dental Journal, 223(11), 826-836. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990

Vancouver

Renton T. Oral surgery II: Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain. British Dental Journal. 2017 Dec 15;223(11):826-836. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990

Author

Renton, T. / Oral surgery II : Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain. In: British Dental Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 223, No. 11. pp. 826-836.

Bibtex Download

@article{853f5f35600541b9871a832fe8cb3896,
title = "Oral surgery II: Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain",
abstract = "Chronic orofacial pain syndromes represent a diagnostic challenge for any practitioner. Patients are frequently misdiagnosed or attribute their pain to a prior event such as a dental procedure, ENT problem or facial trauma. Psychiatric symptoms of depression and anxiety are prevalent in this population and compound the diagnostic conundrum. Treatment is less effective than in other pain syndromes and thus often requires a multidisciplinary approach to address the many facets of these conditions.",
author = "T. Renton",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990",
language = "English",
volume = "223",
pages = "826--836",
journal = "British Dental Journal",
issn = "0007-0610",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "11",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral surgery II

T2 - Part 5. Chronic orofacial pain

AU - Renton, T.

PY - 2017/12/15

Y1 - 2017/12/15

N2 - Chronic orofacial pain syndromes represent a diagnostic challenge for any practitioner. Patients are frequently misdiagnosed or attribute their pain to a prior event such as a dental procedure, ENT problem or facial trauma. Psychiatric symptoms of depression and anxiety are prevalent in this population and compound the diagnostic conundrum. Treatment is less effective than in other pain syndromes and thus often requires a multidisciplinary approach to address the many facets of these conditions.

AB - Chronic orofacial pain syndromes represent a diagnostic challenge for any practitioner. Patients are frequently misdiagnosed or attribute their pain to a prior event such as a dental procedure, ENT problem or facial trauma. Psychiatric symptoms of depression and anxiety are prevalent in this population and compound the diagnostic conundrum. Treatment is less effective than in other pain syndromes and thus often requires a multidisciplinary approach to address the many facets of these conditions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038408196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990

DO - 10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.990

M3 - Article

C2 - 29243716

AN - SCOPUS:85038408196

VL - 223

SP - 826

EP - 836

JO - British Dental Journal

JF - British Dental Journal

SN - 0007-0610

IS - 11

ER -

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