Outpatient management of steroid-induced hyperglycaemia and steroid-induced diabetes in people with lymphoproliferative disorders treated with intermittent high dose steroids

Jennifer Vidler, Charlotte Rogers, Deborah Yallop, Stephen Devereux, Ellinor Wellving, Orla Stewart, Alison Cox, Katharine F. Hunt, Shireen Kassam

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Abstract

High dose steroids (HDS) are used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. The reported risk of steroid-induced diabetes (SID) is high. However, screening is not consistently performed.

We implemented a protocol for detection and management of SID and steroid-induced hyperglycamia (SIH) in haematology outpatients receiving HDS. Eighty-three people were diagnosed with a lymphoproliferative disorder, of whom 6 had known Type 2 diabetes. Fifty-three people without known diabetes were screened by HbA1c and random venous plasma glucose. All patients (n=34) subsequently prescribed HDS checked capillary blood glucose (CBG) pre-breakfast and pre-evening meal. Treatment algorithms used initiation and/or dose titration of gliclazide or human NPH insulin, aiming for pre-meal CBG 5-11mmol/l.

Type 2 diabetes was identified in 4/53 people screened (7.5%). Of 34 people treated with HDS, 17 (44%) developed SIH/SID. All 7 people with Type 2 diabetes developed SIH and 3 required insulin. Of 27 people without known diabetes, 8 (30%) developed SID and 1 required insulin. Pre-treatment HbA1c was higher in people who developed SID compared to those that did not (p=0.002).

This is the first report of a SID/SIH detection and treatment protocol for use in people with lymphoproliferative disorders receiving intermittent HDS, demonstrating its feasibility and safety.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical & Translational Endocrinology
Early online date24 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jun 2017

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