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Outpatient management of steroid-induced hyperglycaemia and steroid-induced diabetes in people with lymphoproliferative disorders treated with intermittent high dose steroids

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jennifer Vidler, Charlotte Rogers, Deborah Yallop, Stephen Devereux, Ellinor Wellving, Orla Stewart, Alison Cox, Katharine F. Hunt, Shireen Kassam

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical & Translational Endocrinology
Early online date24 Jun 2017
DOIs
Accepted/In press21 Jun 2017
E-pub ahead of print24 Jun 2017

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Abstract

High dose steroids (HDS) are used in the treatment of haematological malignancies. The reported risk of steroid-induced diabetes (SID) is high. However, screening is not consistently performed.

We implemented a protocol for detection and management of SID and steroid-induced hyperglycamia (SIH) in haematology outpatients receiving HDS. Eighty-three people were diagnosed with a lymphoproliferative disorder, of whom 6 had known Type 2 diabetes. Fifty-three people without known diabetes were screened by HbA1c and random venous plasma glucose. All patients (n=34) subsequently prescribed HDS checked capillary blood glucose (CBG) pre-breakfast and pre-evening meal. Treatment algorithms used initiation and/or dose titration of gliclazide or human NPH insulin, aiming for pre-meal CBG 5-11mmol/l.

Type 2 diabetes was identified in 4/53 people screened (7.5%). Of 34 people treated with HDS, 17 (44%) developed SIH/SID. All 7 people with Type 2 diabetes developed SIH and 3 required insulin. Of 27 people without known diabetes, 8 (30%) developed SID and 1 required insulin. Pre-treatment HbA1c was higher in people who developed SID compared to those that did not (p=0.002).

This is the first report of a SID/SIH detection and treatment protocol for use in people with lymphoproliferative disorders receiving intermittent HDS, demonstrating its feasibility and safety.

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