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Outsourcing governance: states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’

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Outsourcing governance : states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’. / Mayer, Frederick W. ; Phillips, Nicola.

In: NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY, Vol. 22, No. 2, 04.03.2017, p. 134-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Mayer, FW & Phillips, N 2017, 'Outsourcing governance: states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’', NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 134-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341

APA

Mayer, F. W., & Phillips, N. (2017). Outsourcing governance: states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’. NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY, 22(2), 134-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341

Vancouver

Mayer FW, Phillips N. Outsourcing governance: states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’. NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY. 2017 Mar 4;22(2):134-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341

Author

Mayer, Frederick W. ; Phillips, Nicola. / Outsourcing governance : states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’. In: NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY. 2017 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 134-152.

Bibtex Download

@article{e8d9fe8a70f3488caa32a11df10ff179,
title = "Outsourcing governance: states and the politics of a {\textquoteleft}global value chain world{\textquoteright}",
abstract = "Politics, and by extension states, are marginal in debates about the genesis, evolution and functioning of the global value chain (GVC)-based global economy. We contend here that the core complexity of state agency and state power needs to be much more carefully understood in GVC and related debates, as a basis on which the governance of the evolving GVC world can be properly theorised as revolving around the inseparability of economic and political power. We advance a framework for understanding the role of politics and states in the construction and maintenance of a GVC world, using a three-fold typology of facilitative, regulatory and distributive forms of governance, and propose a notion of {\textquoteleft}outsourcing governance{\textquoteright} as an attempt to capture the ways in which states purposefully, through active political agency, have engaged in a process of delegating a variety of governance functions and authority to private actors. Our overarching argument is normative: {\textquoteleft}outsourced governance{\textquoteright} of the form we currently observe is associated with regressive distributional outcomes, and is antithetical to an inclusive and sustainable global economy.",
author = "Mayer, {Frederick W.} and Nicola Phillips",
year = "2017",
month = mar,
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "134--152",
journal = "NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY",
issn = "1356-3467",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outsourcing governance

T2 - states and the politics of a ‘global value chain world’

AU - Mayer, Frederick W.

AU - Phillips, Nicola

PY - 2017/3/4

Y1 - 2017/3/4

N2 - Politics, and by extension states, are marginal in debates about the genesis, evolution and functioning of the global value chain (GVC)-based global economy. We contend here that the core complexity of state agency and state power needs to be much more carefully understood in GVC and related debates, as a basis on which the governance of the evolving GVC world can be properly theorised as revolving around the inseparability of economic and political power. We advance a framework for understanding the role of politics and states in the construction and maintenance of a GVC world, using a three-fold typology of facilitative, regulatory and distributive forms of governance, and propose a notion of ‘outsourcing governance’ as an attempt to capture the ways in which states purposefully, through active political agency, have engaged in a process of delegating a variety of governance functions and authority to private actors. Our overarching argument is normative: ‘outsourced governance’ of the form we currently observe is associated with regressive distributional outcomes, and is antithetical to an inclusive and sustainable global economy.

AB - Politics, and by extension states, are marginal in debates about the genesis, evolution and functioning of the global value chain (GVC)-based global economy. We contend here that the core complexity of state agency and state power needs to be much more carefully understood in GVC and related debates, as a basis on which the governance of the evolving GVC world can be properly theorised as revolving around the inseparability of economic and political power. We advance a framework for understanding the role of politics and states in the construction and maintenance of a GVC world, using a three-fold typology of facilitative, regulatory and distributive forms of governance, and propose a notion of ‘outsourcing governance’ as an attempt to capture the ways in which states purposefully, through active political agency, have engaged in a process of delegating a variety of governance functions and authority to private actors. Our overarching argument is normative: ‘outsourced governance’ of the form we currently observe is associated with regressive distributional outcomes, and is antithetical to an inclusive and sustainable global economy.

U2 - 10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341

DO - 10.1080/13563467.2016.1273341

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 134

EP - 152

JO - NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY

JF - NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY

SN - 1356-3467

IS - 2

ER -

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