Participants' experiences and acceptability of a home-based walking exercise behaviour-change intervention (MOtivating Structure walking Activity in people with Intermittent Claudication (MOSAIC))

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Abstract

Objectives: This study explored the experiences and acceptability of a novel, home-based, walking exercise behaviour-change intervention (MOtivating Structured walking Activity in people with Intermittent Claudication (MOSAIC)) in adults with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). Design and setting: Individual semi-structured audio-recorded interviews were conducted with adults with Peripheral Arterial Disease who had completed the MOSAIC intervention as part of a randomised clinical trial. Data were analysed using inductive reflexive thematic analysis and interpreted using the seven-construct theoretical framework of acceptability of healthcare interventions (TFA). Participants: Twenty participants (mean age (range) 67(54−80) years, 70% male, 55% White British) were interviewed. Results: One central theme was identified: Acceptability of walking exercise as a treatment. This theme was explained by four linked themes: Exploring walking exercise with a knowledgeable professional, Building confidence with each step, Towards self-management-learning strategies to continue walking and The impact of walking exercise. These themes were interpreted using six of the seven TFA constructs: affective attitude, burden, perceived effectiveness, intervention coherence, opportunity costs, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Participants perceived MOSAIC as an effective, acceptable, and low burden intervention. Physiotherapists were regarded as knowledgeable and supportive professionals who helped participants understand PAD and walking exercise as a treatment. Participants developed confidence to self-manage their condition and their symptoms. As participants confidence and walking capacity improved, they expanded their activities and gained a more positive outlook on their future. MOSAIC is an acceptable intervention that may facilitate adoption of and access to exercise for people with PAD. Implications for practice: • The MOtivating Structured walking Activity in people with Intermittent Claudication (MOSAIC) intervention was perceived as an effective, low burden and acceptable intervention by participants. • Physiotherapists were regarded as knowledgeable and supportive professionals who helped participants understand PAD and walking exercise as a treatment. • MOSAIC helped participants improve their confidence to self-manage their condition and as their walking capacity improved participants expanded their activities and gained a more positive outlook on their future. • Implementation of MOSAIC may facilitate adoption of and access to exercise therapy for people with PAD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-79
Number of pages10
JournalPHYSIOTHERAPY
Volume122
Early online date23 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Aged
  • Female
  • Intermittent Claudication/therapy
  • Exercise Therapy
  • Walking
  • Exercise
  • Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnosis

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