King's College London

Research portal

Patient-reported outcome measures for advanced cancer in China: a systematic review of cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number100371
Pages (from-to)100371
JournalJournal of Cancer Policy
Volume35
Early online date24 Nov 2022
DOIs
E-pub ahead of print24 Nov 2022
PublishedMar 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Apart from K-CSC scholarship, this research received no additional funding from commercial, public, or not-for-profit sectors. Funding Information: This work was undertaken towards a PhD in Palliative Care at the Cicely Saunders Institute, King's College London. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from King's-China Scholarship Council PhD Scholarship programme (K-CSC). Publisher Copyright: © 2022 The Authors

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: The number of patients with advanced cancer in China is rapidly increasing. As services and policy evolve, it is essential to improve the quality of care by measuring outcomes of importance to patients and families by identifying patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for use with advanced cancer patients in China, and critically appraising their cross-cultural adaptation process and measurement properties. Methods: A systematic review was conducted in accordance with COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN), with quality assessment using the Guidelines for the Process of Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Self-Report Measures and COSMIN quality criteria for measurement properties. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, CNKI and WanFang were systematically searched from inception to May 2019, updated to August 2022. Supplemental searches were conducted in grey literature databases, Google scholar and hand-searching of reference lists. Results: From 10793 articles, 437 were selected for full-text review based on titles and abstracts. A total of 46 studies reporting 39 PROMs were retained. No articles were rated as “good quality” in more than four of the six stages of cross-cultural adaptation. At least half of the required information on psychometric properties was missing for each measure. Based on COSMIN, none identified PROMs were valid across all properties nor appropriate to use. Conclusion: There is currently no contextually appropriate and psychometrically sound PROMs for advanced cancer patients in China. The psychometric literature suggest that adaptation of existing measures is the potential solution. Policy summary: Developing outcome measures for advanced cancer patients in China is invaluable to improve audit, clinical services and assess the quality of care, for research purposes and secure funding. Future research in measures’ development, refinement and cross-cultural adaptation in this field is urgently needed.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454