Perceived barriers and enablers influencing physical activity in heart failure: A qualitative one-to-one interview study

Aliya Amirova, Rebecca Lucas, Martin R. Cowie, Mark Haddad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
66 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In heart failure (HF), increased physical activity is associated with improved quality of life, reduced hospitalisation, and increased longevity and is an important aim of treatment. However, physical activity levels in individuals living with HF are typically extremely low. This qualitative study with one-to-one interviews systematically explores perceived clinical, environmental, and psychosocial barriers and enablers in older adults (≥70 years old) living with HF. Semi-structured interviews (N = 16) based on the Theoretical Domains Framework elicited 39 belief statements describing the barriers and enablers to physical activity. Theoretical domains containing these beliefs and corresponding constructs that were both pervasive and common were deemed most relevant. These were: concerns about physical activity (Beliefs about Consequences), self-efficacy (Beliefs about Capabilities), social support (Social Influences), major health event (Environmental Context and Resources), goal behavioural (Goal), action planning (Behavioural Regulation). This work extends the limited research on the modifiable barriers and enablers for physical activity participation by individuals living with HF. The research findings provide insights for cardiologists, HF-specialist nurses, and physiotherapists to help co-design and deliver a physical activity intervention more likely to be effective for individuals living with HF.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0271743
JournalPLoS One
Volume17
Issue number8 August
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Aug 2022

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