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Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data

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Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data. / Ajana, Btihaj.

In: SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION, 18.11.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ajana, B 2020, 'Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data', SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION.

APA

Ajana, B. (2020). Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data. SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION.

Vancouver

Ajana B. Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data. SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION. 2020 Nov 18.

Author

Ajana, Btihaj. / Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data. In: SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION. 2020.

Bibtex Download

@article{9e28800ce8034db8917a599f8d8020c9,
title = "Personal Metrics: Users{\textquoteright} experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data",
abstract = "Self-tracking is becoming a prominent and ubiquitous feature in contemporary practices of health and wellness management. Over the last few years, we have witnessed a rapid development in digital tracking devices, apps and platforms, together with the emergence of health movements such as the Quantified Self. As the world is becoming increasingly ruled by metrics and data, we are becoming ever more reliant on technologies of tracking and measurement to manage and evaluate various spheres of our lives including work, leisure, performance, and health. In this article, I begin by briefly outlining some of the key theoretical approaches that have been informing the scholarly debates on the rise of self-tracking. I then move on to discuss at length the findings of an international survey study I conducted with users of self-tracking technologies to discuss the ways in which they perceive and experience these practices, and the various rationales behind their adoption of self-tracking in the first place. The article also addresses participants{\textquoteright} attitudes towards issues of privacy and data sharing and protection. These attitudes seem to be dominated by a lack of concern regarding the use and sharing of self-tracking data with third parties. Some of the overarching sentiments vis-{\`a}-vis these issues can be roughly categorized according to feelings of {\textquoteleft}trust{\textquoteright} towards companies and how they handle data, a sense of {\textquoteleft}resignation{\textquoteright} in the face of what is perceived as an all-encompassing and ubiquitous data use, feelings of {\textquoteleft}self-insignificance{\textquoteright} which translates into the belief that one{\textquoteright}s data is of no value to others, and the familiar expression of {\textquoteleft}the innocent have nothing to hide{\textquoteright}. Overall, this article highlights the benefits and risks of self-tracking practices as experienced and articulated by the participants, while providing a critical reflection on the rise of personal metrics and the culture of measurement and quantification.",
keywords = "Self-tracking, Quantification, Data, Personal metrics, Privacy, Health, digital health",
author = "Btihaj Ajana",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "18",
language = "English",
journal = "SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION",
issn = "0539-0184",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Personal Metrics: Users’ experiences and perceptions of self-tracking practices and data

AU - Ajana, Btihaj

PY - 2020/11/18

Y1 - 2020/11/18

N2 - Self-tracking is becoming a prominent and ubiquitous feature in contemporary practices of health and wellness management. Over the last few years, we have witnessed a rapid development in digital tracking devices, apps and platforms, together with the emergence of health movements such as the Quantified Self. As the world is becoming increasingly ruled by metrics and data, we are becoming ever more reliant on technologies of tracking and measurement to manage and evaluate various spheres of our lives including work, leisure, performance, and health. In this article, I begin by briefly outlining some of the key theoretical approaches that have been informing the scholarly debates on the rise of self-tracking. I then move on to discuss at length the findings of an international survey study I conducted with users of self-tracking technologies to discuss the ways in which they perceive and experience these practices, and the various rationales behind their adoption of self-tracking in the first place. The article also addresses participants’ attitudes towards issues of privacy and data sharing and protection. These attitudes seem to be dominated by a lack of concern regarding the use and sharing of self-tracking data with third parties. Some of the overarching sentiments vis-à-vis these issues can be roughly categorized according to feelings of ‘trust’ towards companies and how they handle data, a sense of ‘resignation’ in the face of what is perceived as an all-encompassing and ubiquitous data use, feelings of ‘self-insignificance’ which translates into the belief that one’s data is of no value to others, and the familiar expression of ‘the innocent have nothing to hide’. Overall, this article highlights the benefits and risks of self-tracking practices as experienced and articulated by the participants, while providing a critical reflection on the rise of personal metrics and the culture of measurement and quantification.

AB - Self-tracking is becoming a prominent and ubiquitous feature in contemporary practices of health and wellness management. Over the last few years, we have witnessed a rapid development in digital tracking devices, apps and platforms, together with the emergence of health movements such as the Quantified Self. As the world is becoming increasingly ruled by metrics and data, we are becoming ever more reliant on technologies of tracking and measurement to manage and evaluate various spheres of our lives including work, leisure, performance, and health. In this article, I begin by briefly outlining some of the key theoretical approaches that have been informing the scholarly debates on the rise of self-tracking. I then move on to discuss at length the findings of an international survey study I conducted with users of self-tracking technologies to discuss the ways in which they perceive and experience these practices, and the various rationales behind their adoption of self-tracking in the first place. The article also addresses participants’ attitudes towards issues of privacy and data sharing and protection. These attitudes seem to be dominated by a lack of concern regarding the use and sharing of self-tracking data with third parties. Some of the overarching sentiments vis-à-vis these issues can be roughly categorized according to feelings of ‘trust’ towards companies and how they handle data, a sense of ‘resignation’ in the face of what is perceived as an all-encompassing and ubiquitous data use, feelings of ‘self-insignificance’ which translates into the belief that one’s data is of no value to others, and the familiar expression of ‘the innocent have nothing to hide’. Overall, this article highlights the benefits and risks of self-tracking practices as experienced and articulated by the participants, while providing a critical reflection on the rise of personal metrics and the culture of measurement and quantification.

KW - Self-tracking

KW - Quantification

KW - Data

KW - Personal metrics

KW - Privacy

KW - Health

KW - digital health

UR - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0539018420959522

M3 - Article

JO - SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION

JF - SOCIAL SCIENCE INFORMATION

SN - 0539-0184

ER -

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