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Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations: A meta-ethnography

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations : A meta-ethnography. / De Souza, Joanna; Gillett, Karen; Froggatt, Katherine; Walshe, Catherine.

In: Palliative Medicine, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.02.2020, p. 195-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

De Souza, J, Gillett, K, Froggatt, K & Walshe, C 2020, 'Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations: A meta-ethnography', Palliative Medicine, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 195-208. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216319887070

APA

De Souza, J., Gillett, K., Froggatt, K., & Walshe, C. (2020). Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations: A meta-ethnography. Palliative Medicine, 34(2), 195-208. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216319887070

Vancouver

De Souza J, Gillett K, Froggatt K, Walshe C. Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations: A meta-ethnography. Palliative Medicine. 2020 Feb 1;34(2):195-208. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216319887070

Author

De Souza, Joanna ; Gillett, Karen ; Froggatt, Katherine ; Walshe, Catherine. / Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations : A meta-ethnography. In: Palliative Medicine. 2020 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 195-208.

Bibtex Download

@article{3110a9283c9e44e1b34f6b7dd036204d,
title = "Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations: A meta-ethnography",
abstract = "Background: People of Black and minority ethnic heritage are more likely to die receiving life supporting measures and less likely to die at home. End-of-life care decision making often involves adult children as advance care planning is uncommon in these communities. Physicians report family distress as being a major factor in continuing with futile care. Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of the perspectives of elders of Black and minority ethnic heritage and their children, about end-of-life conversations that take place within the family, using a meta-ethnographic approach Design: Systematic interpretive exploration using the process of meta-ethnography was utilised. Data sources: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO databases were searched. Inclusion criteria included studies published between 2005 and 2019 and studies of conversations between ethnic minority elders and family about end-of-life care. Citation snowballing was used to ensure all appropriate references were identified. A total of 13 studies met the inclusion criteria and required quality level using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Results: The following four storylines were constructed: {\textquoteleft}My family will carry out everything for me; it is trust{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}No Mum, don{\textquoteright}t talk like that{\textquoteright}; {\textquoteleft}I leave it in God{\textquoteright}s hands{\textquoteright}; and {\textquoteleft}Who{\textquoteright}s going to look after us?{\textquoteright} The synthesis reflected the dichotomous balance of trust and burden avoidance that characterises the perspectives of Black and minority ethnic elders to end-of-life care planning with their children.",
keywords = "adult children, Attitude to death, decision making, end-of-life conversations, meta-ethnography, race, terminal care",
author = "{De Souza}, Joanna and Karen Gillett and Katherine Froggatt and Catherine Walshe",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0269216319887070",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "195--208",
journal = "Palliative Medicine",
issn = "0269-2163",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perspectives of elders and their adult children of Black and minority ethnic heritage on end-of-life conversations

T2 - A meta-ethnography

AU - De Souza, Joanna

AU - Gillett, Karen

AU - Froggatt, Katherine

AU - Walshe, Catherine

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - Background: People of Black and minority ethnic heritage are more likely to die receiving life supporting measures and less likely to die at home. End-of-life care decision making often involves adult children as advance care planning is uncommon in these communities. Physicians report family distress as being a major factor in continuing with futile care. Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of the perspectives of elders of Black and minority ethnic heritage and their children, about end-of-life conversations that take place within the family, using a meta-ethnographic approach Design: Systematic interpretive exploration using the process of meta-ethnography was utilised. Data sources: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO databases were searched. Inclusion criteria included studies published between 2005 and 2019 and studies of conversations between ethnic minority elders and family about end-of-life care. Citation snowballing was used to ensure all appropriate references were identified. A total of 13 studies met the inclusion criteria and required quality level using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Results: The following four storylines were constructed: ‘My family will carry out everything for me; it is trust’; ‘No Mum, don’t talk like that’; ‘I leave it in God’s hands’; and ‘Who’s going to look after us?’ The synthesis reflected the dichotomous balance of trust and burden avoidance that characterises the perspectives of Black and minority ethnic elders to end-of-life care planning with their children.

AB - Background: People of Black and minority ethnic heritage are more likely to die receiving life supporting measures and less likely to die at home. End-of-life care decision making often involves adult children as advance care planning is uncommon in these communities. Physicians report family distress as being a major factor in continuing with futile care. Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of the perspectives of elders of Black and minority ethnic heritage and their children, about end-of-life conversations that take place within the family, using a meta-ethnographic approach Design: Systematic interpretive exploration using the process of meta-ethnography was utilised. Data sources: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO databases were searched. Inclusion criteria included studies published between 2005 and 2019 and studies of conversations between ethnic minority elders and family about end-of-life care. Citation snowballing was used to ensure all appropriate references were identified. A total of 13 studies met the inclusion criteria and required quality level using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. Results: The following four storylines were constructed: ‘My family will carry out everything for me; it is trust’; ‘No Mum, don’t talk like that’; ‘I leave it in God’s hands’; and ‘Who’s going to look after us?’ The synthesis reflected the dichotomous balance of trust and burden avoidance that characterises the perspectives of Black and minority ethnic elders to end-of-life care planning with their children.

KW - adult children

KW - Attitude to death

KW - decision making

KW - end-of-life conversations

KW - meta-ethnography

KW - race

KW - terminal care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85078216187&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0269216319887070

DO - 10.1177/0269216319887070

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31965907

AN - SCOPUS:85078216187

VL - 34

SP - 195

EP - 208

JO - Palliative Medicine

JF - Palliative Medicine

SN - 0269-2163

IS - 2

ER -

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