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Perspectives on implementing HIIT interventions for service users in inpatient mental health settings: A qualitative study investigating patient, carer and staff attitudes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-206
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume283
DOIs
Published15 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This research was reviewed by a team with experience of mental health problems and their carers who have been specially trained to advise on research proposals and documentation through the Young Person's Mental Health Advisory Group (YPMHAG) and the Feasibility and Acceptability Support Team for Researchers (FAST-R): two separate free, confidential services in England provided by the National Institute for Health Research Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre via King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. We would like to thank all patients, carers and healthcare professionals who took part in the study. Funding Information: Funding – This paper represents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. RM is supported by a PhD studentship from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. BS is supported by a Clinical Lectureship (ICA-CL-2017-03-001) jointly funded by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). FG and JO are part supported by the National Institute for Health Research's (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. FG is also supported by, the Maudsley Charity and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London (NIHR ARC South London) at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. The funding partners had no involvement in the study at any stage, nor did they influence the decision to publish. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: High intensity interval training (HIIT) may have beneficial effects among people living with severe mental illness (SMI), however there remains an absence of information on attitudes of key stakeholders (e.g. family carers, healthcare professionals) towards offering HIIT interventions in psychiatric inpatient settings. This study sought to qualitatively investigate, in inpatients with SMI, carer and staff groups, perspectives on implementing HIIT interventions for patient groups in inpatient settings. Methods: Seven focus groups and one individual interview were conducted. These included three focus groups held with inpatients with SMI (n=13), two held with carers (n=15), and two held with healthcare professionals working in inpatient settings (n=11). An additional individual interview was conducted with one patient participant. Results: Two key themes emerged from the data, across all participants, that reflected the ‘Positivity’ in the application of HIIT interventions in psychiatric inpatient settings with beliefs that it would help patients feel more relaxed, build their fitness, and provide a break from the monotony of ward environments. The second theme related to ‘Implementation concerns’, that reflected subthemes about i) patient motivation, ii) patient safety and iii) practical logistical factors, including having access to the right sports clothing and staff availability. Limitations: Investigations were limited to one mental health service provider and participants might already be those with an interest in exercise-based interventions. Conclusions: HIIT interventions for SMI inpatients were perceived positively by key stakeholders. However, individual and organisational barriers to successful implementation are identified and should be addressed in advance.

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