King's College London

Research portal

Phenomenology of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared to men anxious about their penis size and to men without concerns: A cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

David Veale, Sarah Miles, Julie Read, Andrea Troglia, Lina Carmona, Chiara Fiorito, Hannah Wells, Kevan Wylie, Gordon Muir

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-61
Number of pages9
JournalBody Image
Volume13
DOIs
E-pub ahead of printMar 2015

Documents

  • 57A Characterstics Men PSA BDD ACCEPTED

    57A_Characterstics_Men_PSA_BDD_ACCEPTED.pdf, 227 KB, application/pdf

    Uploaded date:21 Jul 2015

    Version:Accepted author manuscript

    NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Body Image. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication.

King's Authors

Abstract

Men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) may be preoccupied with the size or shape of the penis, which may be causing significant shame or impairment. Little is known about the characteristics and phenomenology of such men and whether they can be differentiated from men with small penis anxiety (SPA) (who do not have BDD), and men with no penile concerns. Twenty-six men with BDD, 31 men with SPA, and 33 men without penile concerns were compared on psychopathology, experiences of recurrent imagery, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviours. Men with BDD had significantly higher scores than both the SPA group and no penile concern group for measures of imagery, avoidance, safety seeking and general psychopathology. The groups differed on the phenomenology of BDD specific to penile size preoccupation clearly from the worries of SPA, which in turn were different to those of the men without concerns. The common avoidance and safety seeking behaviours were identified in such men that may be used clinically.

Download statistics

No data available

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454