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Plastic genes are in!

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Plastic genes are in! / Silva, A J; Giese, K P.

In: CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1994, p. 413-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Silva, AJ & Giese, KP 1994, 'Plastic genes are in!', CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 413-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X

APA

Silva, A. J., & Giese, K. P. (1994). Plastic genes are in! CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY, 4(3), 413-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X

Vancouver

Silva AJ, Giese KP. Plastic genes are in! CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY. 1994;4(3):413-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X

Author

Silva, A J ; Giese, K P. / Plastic genes are in!. In: CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY. 1994 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 413-20.

Bibtex Download

@article{5d8a16fd7edb44bc885744cc3df94b8c,
title = "Plastic genes are in!",
abstract = "Even though the synthesis of new proteins is thought to be essential for long-term changes in synaptic plasticity, as well as for long-term memory, little is known about the identity of the required proteins. The hunt for these molecules is under way, however, and in the past year several groups of researchers have entered this fascinating search by introducing new approaches that have lead to the identification of several potential candidates, amongst which are trophic factors, kinases, ion channels, and proteases. The results will have much to say not only about the nature of memory, but also about the mechanisms of learning.",
author = "Silva, {A J} and Giese, {K P}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "413--20",
journal = "CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY",
issn = "0959-4388",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plastic genes are in!

AU - Silva, A J

AU - Giese, K P

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Even though the synthesis of new proteins is thought to be essential for long-term changes in synaptic plasticity, as well as for long-term memory, little is known about the identity of the required proteins. The hunt for these molecules is under way, however, and in the past year several groups of researchers have entered this fascinating search by introducing new approaches that have lead to the identification of several potential candidates, amongst which are trophic factors, kinases, ion channels, and proteases. The results will have much to say not only about the nature of memory, but also about the mechanisms of learning.

AB - Even though the synthesis of new proteins is thought to be essential for long-term changes in synaptic plasticity, as well as for long-term memory, little is known about the identity of the required proteins. The hunt for these molecules is under way, however, and in the past year several groups of researchers have entered this fascinating search by introducing new approaches that have lead to the identification of several potential candidates, amongst which are trophic factors, kinases, ion channels, and proteases. The results will have much to say not only about the nature of memory, but also about the mechanisms of learning.

U2 - 10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X

DO - 10.1016/0959-4388(94)90104-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 7919937

VL - 4

SP - 413

EP - 420

JO - CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY

JF - CURRENT OPINION IN NEUROBIOLOGY

SN - 0959-4388

IS - 3

ER -

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